Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Faba

(4 words)

see  Beans

Faberius

(107 words)

Fabia

(410 words)

Author(s): Strothmann, Meret (Bochum) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] [1] F. Two daughters of the patrician Ambustus with the same name Two daughters of the patrician Ambustus with the same name. The younger one had married the plebeian Licinius Stolo whilst the old…

Fabianus

(77 words)

Author(s): Fröhlich, Roland (Tübingen)
[German version] [1] Rom. bishop AD 236-250 Pope from AD 236 to 250, a Roman, divided the church of Rome into seven districts headed by deacons; from these later developed (12th cent.) the churches headed by cardinals. F. is mentioned in Euseb. Hist. eccl. VI,29, Jer. Ep. 84,10, Cypr. Ep. 9,1, Novatianus (Cypr. Ep. 30,5). Fröhlich, Roland (Tübingen) Bibliography…

Fabius

(6,346 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris) | Kierdorf, Wilhelm (Cologne) | Scholz, Udo W. (Würzburg) | Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Et al.
Roman patrician family name, probably derived from Etruscan fapi [1. 162]. According to ancient etymology, however, either from faba ‘(broad)bean’ (‘legume grower’: Plin. HN 18,10; [2]) or from the original ‘Fodius’, ‘Fovius’ (‘wolf pit hunter’: Plut. Fabius 1,2; Fest. 77 L.) because the Fabii with the Quinctii originally appointed the priesthood of the Luperci; the  Lupercalia were also the family celebration of the Fabii (Ov. Fast. 193ff.). Early Imperial pseudogenealogy, which perhaps arose in the literary ci…

Fable

(3,299 words)

Author(s): Dithmar, Reinhard (Berlin RWG)
Dithmar, Reinhard (Berlin RWG) [German version] A. Concept (CT) Fable (Lat. fabula, 'that which is made up'), with the addition 'Aesopic' already used by Phaedrus as a generic term for exemplary animal stories and the like, was introduced into German by H. Steinhöwel ( Der Ulmer Aesop of 1476/77, ed. O. Schäfer, 1992). The oldest fables appear in Ionic poetry and are called ainos

Fable

(4,354 words)

Author(s): Böck, Barbara (Madrid) | Luzzatto, Maria Jagoda (Florence) | Küppers, Jochem (Düsseldorf)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient No evidence exists of there being a term for the fable itself either in the Sumerian or the Akkadian fable. The fable is a short, fictitious story with an inherent moral, the characters of which are personified animals. Reduced to the moral, several fables have attained the status of a proverb. The fable has its origin in oral literature; it represents a simple form of the allegory. Rank disputes/tenzons (main protagonists: personified animals, natural phenomena and…

Fabrateria

(210 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] [1] F. Vetus Town of the Hernici on the Trerus (modern Sacco) near Frosinone ( Frusino) in Latium adiectum ( regio I), called F. Vetus from the end of the 2nd cent. BC, near the church of Santa Maria del Fiume near Ceccano (cf. CIL X p. 552, 5647-5661; EEpigr 8, 888f.). As a Volscian town, it was involved in Rome's disputes with the Samnites (Liv. 8,19,1) in 330. Initially civitas sine suffragio, then municipium, tribus Tromentina (CIL X 5657); under dictatores, later administered by IV viri and decuriones. Cult of Ceres and Hercules. Centuriation area. Uggeri, Giovanni (…

Fabri

(264 words)

Author(s): Wierschowski, Lothar (Oldenburg)
[German version] In the military context fabri were craftsmen of the Roman army who were under the command of the praefectus fabrum. According to Livy (1,43,3), they initially formed two independent cohorts; at the latest from the time of Caesar onwards they were classified as soldiers of the legion (Caes. B Gall. 5,11,3). Vegetius (2,11) mentions the tignarii,

Fabrica, fabricenses

(763 words)

Author(s): Herz, Peter (Regensburg)
[German version] Originally fabrica only refers to the finished work (ThlL VI 12ff.), but later it primarily refers to the place where something was manufactured. Fabricae as production centres for equipment first appear in the direct military environment [11]. The first five fabricae with civilian employees were established in the Orient under Diocletian (Ioh. Mal. 307,21ff.). Not. Dign. Or. 11,18ff. and Not. Dign. Occ. 9,15ff provide an overview of the stock at the end of the 4th cent. The fabricae were subordinate to the praefectus praetorio (Cod.Theod. 10,22,2) up to c. 388, then…

Fabricius

(716 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
Roman plebeian nomen gentile, probably not from faber (‘smith’), but from Etruscan hapre like Faberius and others. [1; 2]. Perhaps the family immigrated to Rome [3], in the 3rd cent. BC it became part of the nobility with F. [I 3] but was unable to maintain this status in the 2nd cent. In Rome there was a compitum Fabricium (Fest. 180L) or a vicus Fabrici (ILS 6073) between Caelius and Palatine, perhaps named after the place of residence of F. [I 3] [4], and the pons Fabricius,  F. [I 1]. I. Republican period [German version] …

Fabulla

(97 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] Wife of a certain Asiaticus, mentioned in the will of Domitius [II 25] Tullus as the recipient of a legacy (AE 1976, 77); she is presumably identical to the F. mentioned in Apollonius [14] of Tyana as th…

Fabullus

(151 words)

Author(s): Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance)
[German version] Friend of  Catullus, recipient of the poem of invitation of Catull. 13, mostly mentioned together with Veranius: from Hispania Citerior they send Catullus a serviette (Catull. 12,14ff., cf. Catull. 9); about the time of his journey to Bithynia (57/6 BC) they are part of the cohors of a governor Piso (p…

Facial expression

(469 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] FE means the expressive motions of the entire face (moods) or parts of it that spontaneously indicate a momentary human mood or are deliberately assumed with the intention of making a particular expression. FE's are often situation-related and supplemented by  gestures ( Gestus) or even only become comprehensible through the latter. On the stage individual characters were shown with differing FE's ( Masks,  Mimos). FE's were also a means of providing a person (e.g. a philosopher, …

Factiones

(1,211 words)

Author(s): Eder, Walter (Berlin) | Hönle, Augusta (Rottweil)
[German version] I. Republic In Rome the permanent or temporary union between people who were mostly of high rank so as to preserve or assert similar interests. Initially used…

Fadius

(140 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
Roman nomen gentile, attested to from the 1st cent. BC (Schulze, 132; 516). I. Republican period …

Faenius Rufus, L.

(103 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] …

Faesulae

(281 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: …

Fagifulae

(94 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Town of the Samnites Pentri ( regio IV) on a hill to the right of the Tifernus. In 217 BC won back from the Carthaginians by Q. Fabius Maximus (Liv. 24,20,5). Municipium, tribus Voltinia (Plin. HN 3,107; CIL IX p. 237). Its location was pinpointed at the Church of Santa Maria di Faífula (Faífoli) near Montágano north of Campobasso. Epigraphical evidence: CIL IX 2551-2561; EEpigr 8, 109. Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) Bibliography A. Degrassi, Quattuorviri, in: Id., Scritti vari 1, 1962, 150ff. G. De Benedettis, F., in: S. Capini (ed.), Samnium. Archeologia del Molis…

Fagus

(4 words)

see  Beech
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