Christian-Muslim Relations 600 - 1500

Get access Subject: Middle East and Islamic Studies
General Editor: David Thomas, Alex Mallett
Associate Editors: Juan Pedro Monferrer-Sala, Johannes Pahlitzsch, Barbara Roggema, Mark Swanson, Herman Teule and John Tolan
 
Christian-Muslim Relations, a Bibliographical History Online is a general online history of relations between the faiths. It covers the period from 600 to 1500, when encounters took place through the extended Mediterranean basin and are recorded in Syriac, Arabic, Greek, Latin and other languages. Christian Muslim Relations Online comprises introductory essays on the treatment of Christians in the Qur’an, Qur’an commentaries, biographies of the Prophet, Hadith and Sunni law, and of Muslims in canon law, and the main body of more than two hundred detailed entries on all the works recorded, whether surviving or lost.

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 Syāmā ʿal haymānutā

(333 words)

Author(s): Roggema, Barbara
Treatise on faith Job of Edessa, Job ‘the Spotted’, Ayyub Urhāyā, Ayyūb al-Ruhāwī ‘al-Abrash’ Date: Unknown, probably before 817 Original Language: Syriac Description This is another lost apologetic treatise to which Job refers in the Book of treasures (Mingana, p. 458, trans. p. 279). He mentions that it treated various aspects of the Christian faith, such as the unitarian and trinitarian nature of God, the necessity of baptism, the eucharist, worship to the east, i.e. apologetic topics of crucial importance to Christians in the M…

 Syāmā ḥad b-yad ʿesrā sulughismē kyānāyē da-mḥawwēn ʿal mshiḥā d-Alāhā hu w-barnāshā  

(432 words)

Author(s): Roggema, Barbara
Treatise containing ten syllogisms taken from the nature of things, which prove that Christ is both God and man, Treatise to prove that Christ is both God and man Job of Edessa, Job ‘the Spotted’, Ayyub Urhāyā, Ayyūb al-Ruhāwī ‘al-Abrash’ Date: Unknown, probably before 817 Original Language: Syriac Description This treatise is only known through a later work of Job of Edessa, the Book of treasures, in which he briefly explains its content and purpose, as follows: ‘Our aim has generally been in all our works to demonstrate our statements from the nature of thi…

 Symbouleutikos heteros peri tēs Kallipoleōs, litēsantos tou Mouratou

(411 words)

Author(s): Tinnefeld, Franz
Oratio de non reddenda Callipoli 'Advisory speech on Kallipolis, pursued by Murad' Demetrius Cydones Date: 1376/77 or 1371 Original Language: Greek Description The town and stronghold of Kallipolis (Gallipoli) on the European shore of the Hellespont was much sought after by the Ottomans as a stronghold, and a few years after its recapture by Amedeus VI of Savoy it was again lost to them. It is uncertain whether this happened in the summer of 1371 or as late as 1376/77; Barker ( Manuel II Palaiologos, pp. 30, 458-61) argues for the later date against an earlier consensus. It was…

 Symbouleutikos pros tous Thessalonikeis

(519 words)

Author(s): Todt, Klaus-Peter
ʻDiscourse of counsel to the Thessalonians' Manuel II Palaeologus Date: Most probably autumn 1383 Original Language: Greek Description After the siege of Thessaloniki by the Ottoman army at the end of September/beginning of October 1383, the Ottomans demanded the inhabitants’ submission to the sultan and payment of tribute. Manuel called the inhabitants of the city together ( syllogos) and outlined the measures they should take in order to avoid such a humiliation. The surrounding towns, he said, had been conquered because they had not given one anoth…

Symeon at the dictation of Joseph, disciple of Theoduṭe

(112 words)

Author(s): Palmer, Andrew
Symeon of Samosata Date of Birth: Unknown Place of Birth: Samosata Date of Death: Unknown Place of Death: Unknown Biography Symeon (Shemʿun) describes himself as a priest and precentor and says that he wrote the Life of Theoduṭe (Greek: Theodotos; d. 698) in his native city, Samosata, at the dictation of the priest Joseph, who was the disciple of Theoduṭe and a monk of the monastery of Zuqnīn outside the city of Āmīd (Amida). No more is known about the life of Symeon. Primary Sources of Information See below Secondary Sources of Information See below Works on Christian-Muslim Relations

Synaxarion of the Greek Church

(60 words)

Author(s): Flusin, Bernard
Unknown author Date of Birth: Place of Birth: Date of Death: Place of Death: Biography - Primary Sources of Information - Secondary Sources of Information - Works on Christian-Muslim Relations Synaxarion periechon holou tou eniautou tōn hagiōn kai tōn hosiōn en syntomō ta hypomnēmata Majmūʿ li-l-sana kullihā tadhkūr fīhi akhbār al-qiddīsīn … Bernard Flusin

 Synaxarion periechon holou tou eniautou tōn hagiōn kai tōn hosiōn en syntomō ta hypomnēmata

(4,415 words)

Author(s): Flusin, Bernard
Synaxarium Ecclesiae ConstantinopolitanaeSynaxarion containing abstracts of deeds of the blessed saints and martyrs for the whole year, Synaxarion of the Great Church Synaxarion of the Greek Church Date: Late 9th century (P); between 945 and 959 (Synaxarion of Euaristus, H*); late 10th century (B*); late 10th-early 12th centuries (other recensions) Original Language: Greek Description The Synaxarion of Constantinople is the liturgical book – though Synaxaries, together with other liturgical texts, are frequently part of larger collections – in whic…

 Syngraphikai historiai

(1,075 words)

Author(s): Mitsiou, Ekaterini
‘Historical narration’ George Pachymeres Date: After 1307 Original Language: Greek Description The Syngraphikai historiai (called Chronikon, ‘Chronicle’, in MS Munich – Monac. Gr. 442, and Rhomaik ē historia, ‘Roman history’, in MS Paris, BNP – Gr. 1723) is divided into 13 books. The first six deal with the reign of Michael VIII Palaeologus (r. 1259-82), and the rest with that of his son Andronicus II Palaeologus (r. 1282-1328) up to 1307. Pachymeres began it after 1291, and he finished it in 1307. At the end of the 14th …

 Szabács Viadala

(1,896 words)

Author(s): Dobozy, Maria
'The Battle of Szabács' The Battle of Szabács Date: 1476-77 Original Language: Hungarian Description This poem in rhymed couplets survives as a fragment on a single leaf of paper, 300 x 220 mm, located in Budapest (National Széchényi Library – Mny 2, Kat. sz. 57). It was discovered in 1871 in the archive of the Csicsery family (in Csicser) by Deszö Véghely. The paper, probably made in Venice (see Imre, A Szabács viadala, p. 279), the gall ink and the handwriting correspond closely to the time of the events themselves and allow a dating of 1476 or very soon thereafte…