Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World

Get access Subject: History
Edited by: Philip Ford (†), Jan Bloemendal and Charles Fantazzi

With its striking range and penetrating depth, Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World traces the enduring history and wide-ranging cultural influence of Neo-Latin, the form of Latin that originated in the Italian Renaissance and persists to the modern era. Featuring original contributions by a host of distinguished international scholars, this comprehensive reference work explores every aspect of the civilized world from literature and law to philosophy and the sciences.

Subscriptions: Brill.com

Neo-Latin and Renaissance Schools

(4,151 words)

Author(s): Mack, Peter
¶ Since there were no native speakers of Latin in the Renaissance, grammar school education was needed to train both the writers of Neo-Latin and their audiences. As in the Middle Ages, the main goal o…

Neo-Latin and Vernacular Influences in Prose Writing

(1,225 words)

Author(s): Deneire, Tom
¶ The history of Neo-Latin prose style basically reads as a debate between Ciceronianism and Anti-Ciceronianism, from the Ciceronian controversies of Quattrocento Italy, to the complicated seventeenth-…

Neo-Latin Book Series

(669 words)

Author(s): Verbeke, Demmy
¶ Several series of publications are specifically dedicated to or are otherwise relevant for Neo-Latin studies. Most of these provide editions (with or without translations into a modern vernacular) of…

Neo-Latin: Character and Development*

(10,212 words)

Author(s): Ramminger, Johann
Introduction Definition of Neo-Latin…

Neo-Latin Drama

(7,257 words)

Author(s): Bloemendal, Jan
Introduction ¶ In Italy around 1300 and in Germany around 1500 a new genre arose that would flourish for centuries: Neo-Latin drama.…

Neo-Latin Fiction

(8,555 words)

Author(s): Morrish, Jennifer
¶ The subject of this article is the Neo-Latin novel, a genre whose texts are far less well-known today t…

Neo-Latin Forgeries

(2,304 words)

Author(s): Olds, Katrina B.
¶ It might seem counterintuitive to assert that the height of neo-Latin scholarship in the fifte…

Neo-Latin Grammars—Guarino da Verona’s Regulae grammaticales

(1,078 words)

Author(s): Pade, Marianne
¶ Guarino (1374–1460) composed his Latin textbook, the Regulae grammaticales ( Rules of Grammar), around 1418, but he may well have revised the work later, in the light of experiences collected during his long teaching career.1 It was …

Neo-Latin Grammars—Niccolò Perotti’s Rudimenta grammatices

(1,102 words)

Author(s): Pade, Marianne
¶ Though not a highly original work, Niccolò Perotti’s (1430–1480) Rudimenta grammatices (Elementary Grammar, 1468) is a milestone in Latin grammar and became the most widely diffused humanist Latin grammar of t…

Neo-Latin Journals

(575 words)

Author(s): Verbeke, Demmy
¶ Only two journals are explicitly and exclusively devoted to Neo-Latin studies. The first is Humanistica Lovaniensia (HL), which was originally founded as a series of monographs concerning Renaissance humanism in th…

Neo-Latin Literary Genres and the Classical Tradition: Adaptation and Inventions

(3,670 words)

Author(s): Bloemendal, Jan
¶ Much of Neo-Latin bonae litterae is oriented towards classical literature. In the various genres, as they are traditionally called, this literary production looked back to Latin—and to a lesser …

Neo-Latin Literature—Bohemia

(2,189 words)

Author(s): Juríková, Erika
¶ The Latin language was used by Bohemian cosmopolitan authors until the early nineteenth century. Many Bohemian scholars studied and worked in academic positions at prestigious European universities, and after their return to their homeland they contributed to the development of Bohemian literature. This was the case for Sigismund Gelenius (Sigismund of Jelení), who in the sixteenth century worked for the Frobenius printing house in Basel, or the teacher of nations, Jan Amos Comenius, who wrote his greatest works in Leszno (Poland), in Sárospatak (Hungary) and in the Netherlands. Beginning in the Middle Ages, in addition to Latin and Old Czech, German formed the third cultural coexistence. Efforts to translate ancien…
▲   Back to top   ▲