Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World

Get access Subject: History
Edited by: Philip Ford (†), Jan Bloemendal and Charles Fantazzi

With its striking range and penetrating depth, Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World traces the enduring history and wide-ranging cultural influence of Neo-Latin, the form of Latin that originated in the Italian Renaissance and persists to the modern era. Featuring original contributions by a host of distinguished international scholars, this comprehensive reference work explores every aspect of the civilized world from literature and law to philosophy and the sciences.

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Humanist Centres—Leiden and Philology

(1,589 words)

Author(s): van Dam, Harm-Jan
¶ Leiden University, founded by the States of Holland and Zeeland as a substitute for the Catholic universities of Douai and Louvain in the south and as an alternative for the German Protestant univers…

Humanist Centres—Naples

(1,328 words)

Author(s): Lamers, Han
¶ As in other Italian cities, the humanist movement in Naples was inextricably bound up with Neapolitan politics. But more than in other cities, it was centred round one single court: that of the Arago…

Humanistic Script

(525 words)

Author(s): Mengelkoch, Dustin
¶ Humanistic script ( humanistic rotunda or formata) is not one particular script, but a system of scripts developed in Italy and used from the end of the fourteenth century through the middle of the sixteen…

Humanist Printers

(7,400 words)

Author(s): White, Paul
¶ The humanist printer has a starring role to play in the story of the Renaissance. An appealing and charismatic figure, the Renaissance ‘scholar-printer’ stands out as an exemplary embodiment of human…