Encyclopedia of Ancient Greek Language and Linguistics

Get access Subject: Language and Linguistics

General Editor: Georgios K. Giannakis
Associate Editors: Vit Bubenik, Emilio Crespo, Chris Golston, Alexandra Lianeri, Silvia Luraghi, Stephanos Matthaios

The Encyclopedia of Ancient Greek Language and Linguistics (EAGLL) is a unique work that brings together the latest research from across a range of disciplines which contribute to our knowledge of Ancient Greek. It is an indispensable research tool for scholars and students of Greek, of linguistics, and of other Indo-European languages, as well as of Biblical literature.

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Focus

(3,032 words)

Author(s): Nicolas Bertrand
Abstract The expression of ‘focus’ (a key notion of information structure) is explored here in detail. The two focus constructions observable in Ancient Greek word order, broad focus and narrow focus, are sucessively described and related to universal focus structures. In the course of the article, more specific matters are dealt with, namely the unmarked status of the broad-focus construction, polarity focus and thetic statements. 1. General Background The notion of focus is part of the information structure of any language (Information Structure and Greek). Th…
Date: 2013-11-01

Foot

(2,265 words)

Author(s): Tomas Riad
Abstract The foot (Gk. poús) in poetic meter typically refers to the unit made up of two metrical positions, which carries a name like iamb, trochee, dactyl, spondee, or anapest. Meters are usually referred to in terms of what is taken to be the canonical form of the verse foot, plus a specification of line length in terms of metron ( dactylic hexameter, iambic trimeter, spondaic pentameter, etc.). Feet in meter correspond roughly to prosodic words in phonology. 1. Definition The foot (Gk. poús) in poetic meter typically refers to the unit made up of two metrical positions, wh…
Date: 2013-11-01

Formation of Doric Koines, The

(2,273 words)

Author(s): Vit Bubenik
Abstract During the last three pre-Christian centuries the ‘Koineization’ processes in the Doric territories gave rise to several regional varieties referred to as Doric Koines: North-West Koine (with the focus in Aetolia), Achaean Doric Koine (in Peloponnesian Achaea), South-East Aegean Koine (in Dodecanese with the focus in Rhodes), and Sicilian Koine. Their phonological and morphological features can be studied by means of numerous inscriptions from these areas. 1. Introduction The period of Macedonian domination resulted in a thorough-going change in th…
Date: 2013-11-01

Forms of Address and Sociolinguistic Variation

(1,712 words)

Author(s): Paolo Poccetti
Abstract Forms of address are words and phrases in a language, by which a speaker addresses someone, usually in opening or closing an interaction. In Ancient Greek, forms of address vary according to the conversational context and the precise relationship of the speakers involved; in literature, they also vary according to style and genre, often in surprising ways.  Forms of address are words and phrases in a language, by which a speaker addresses someone, usually in opening or closing an interaction. People define their relationships to each other through forms of address, identify…
Date: 2013-11-01

Formulaic Language

(3,471 words)

Author(s): Françoise Létoublon
Abstract Formulaic Language is investigated first through the history of the notion of formula prior to Milman Parry in the ‘Quarrel of the Ancients and Moderns’ in France, next through Villoison and Wolf, then with the definition by Parry and the notion of the Greek Encyclopedia developed by E. A. Havelock. Parry, through his review of Arend’s book, discovered the link between formulas and typical scenes, through which the concept of oral poetry would later arise. Several uses of formulas are de…
Date: 2014-01-22

Formulas

(2,264 words)

Author(s): Steve Reece
Abstract Formulas are the verbal building blocks of ancient Greek poetry.  They are most conspicuous in dactylic hexameter epic verse, where they appear as standardized phrases that are ‘stitched’ together – to use an ancient metaphor – by epic poets to describe the typical characters and objects and to narrate the typical actions of heroic epic: ‘rosy-fingered Dawn’; ‘dark-prowed ships’; ‘he fell with a thud and his armor rattled about him’.  Research on the essential nature of the formula was the key to determining that Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, and, by extension, all early Gree…
Date: 2013-11-01

Functional Grammar and Greek

(2,383 words)

Author(s): Jesús de la Villa
Abstract Functional Grammar (FG) is a theory based on the proposals by S. C. Dik (1997²). It considers semantic, syntactic and pragmatic factors as equally important for linguistic description. A number of predominantly Dutch, Spanish and Italian linguists have used Functional Grammar as a theoretical framework for Ancient Greek. The most relevant areas where it has been applied are: verb syntax and semantics, sentence structure, discourse structure and pragmatics. 1. Definition Functional Grammar (FG) is a theory based originally on the proposals by S.C. Dik (e.g. 1997²), late…
Date: 2013-11-01

Future Perfect

(12 words)

Abstract   See Verbal System (Tense, Aspect, Mood) Bibliography  
Date: 2014-01-27

Future Tense

(12 words)

Abstract   See Verbal System (Tense, Aspect, Mood) Bibliography  
Date: 2014-01-27