Christian-Muslim Relations 600 - 1500

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 Ḥikmat Sibillā ibnat Harqalus raʾs ḥunafāʾ Afasus, allādhī tanabbaʾat ʿalā l-manẓar allādhī naẓarū hāʾulāʾika l-miʾat rajul fī layla wāḥida (This is according to the oldest manuscript, Sinai Ar. 461 (9th-10th c.), fol. 34a, although details vary from manuscript to manuscript. The first noun in the title may be ḥikma (‘wisdom’), qiṣṣa (‘story’), or nubuwwa (‘prophesy’), while the name of the prophetess is written in various ways with uncertain vocalization, e.g. Sibilla/Sabilla or Sabīla, ending either in alif or tāʾ marbūṭa.
(1,438 words)



The Wisdom of Sibilla, daughter of Heraclius, head of the pagans of Ephesus, which she prophesied concerning the vision which those hundred men saw in a single night’The Arabic Sibylline prophecy, The oriental Sibylline

Unknown series of redactors

Date: The ‘primitive’ Arabic recension may date to the 8th century. An expanded recension took shape c. 815.

Original Language: Arabic

Description

A Christian apocalyptic legend which has come down to us in a variety of …

Cite this page
N. Swanson, Mark, “ Ḥikmat Sibillā ibnat Harqalus raʾs ḥunafāʾ Afasus, allādhī tanabbaʾat ʿalā l-manẓar allādhī naẓarū hāʾulāʾika l-miʾat rajul fī layla wāḥida (This is according to the oldest manuscript, Sinai Ar. 461 (9th-10th c.), fol. 34a, although details vary from manuscript to manuscript. The first noun in the title may be ḥikma (‘wisdom’), qiṣṣa (‘story’), or nubuwwa (‘prophesy’), while the name of the prophetess is written in various ways with uncertain vocalization, e.g. Sibilla/Sabilla or Sabīla, ending either in alif or tāʾ marbūṭa.”, in: Christian-Muslim Relations 600 - 1500, General Editor David Thomas. Consulted online on 18 June 2019 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1877-8054_cmri_COM_23611>
First published online: 2010



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