Encyclopaedia of Islam, Second Edition

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Nassads
(241 words)

, the common European form of the name given to the light wooden warships built in Nassau or Hohenau (Lower Austria), the “Nassauer” or “Hohenauer”, Magyar naszád , pl. naszádok , Slav, nasad , which were used on the Danube. They were usually manned by Serbian seamen who were called martalos [q.v.] (from the Magyar martolóc , martalóz , lit. “robber”). According to a Florentine account, this Danube flotilla in 1475 consisted of 330 ships manned by 10,000 “nassadists” armed with lances, shields, crossbow or bow and arrow, more rarely with muskets. The larger ships had also cannon. …

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Babinger, Fr., “Nassads”, in: Encyclopaedia of Islam, Second Edition, Edited by: P. Bearman, Th. Bianquis, C.E. Bosworth, E. van Donzel, W.P. Heinrichs. Consulted online on 25 February 2021 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1573-3912_islam_SIM_5845>
First published online: 2012
First print edition: ISBN: 9789004161214, 1960-2007



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