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Reward and Punishment in Classical Judaism
(6,221 words)

God's will is rational, within humankind's understanding of reason, because it is just. And by “just,” the sages of classical Judaism understood the commonsense meaning: fair, equitable, proportionate. In place of fate or impersonal destiny, chance or irrational, inexplicable chaos, God's purpose is seen everywhere to come to realization. The Oral Torah thus identifies God's will as the active and causative force in the lives of individuals and nations.

But how do sages know that God's will is realized in the moral order of justice, involving reward and punishmen…

Cite this page
Neusner, Jacob, “Reward and Punishment in Classical Judaism”, in: Encyclopaedia of Judaism. Consulted online on 20 October 2019 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1872-9029_EJ_DUM_0012>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004141001, 20040701



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