Haplology
(651 words)

Abstract

Haplology is the loss of a syllable that is similar to a syllable nearby.

Haplology is the loss of a syllable that is similar to a syllable nearby, as when Latinnutritrix ‘nurse’ became nutrix through loss of the repeated tri, or when EnglishAnglaland ‘land of the Angles’ became England through loss of the repeated la. The phenomenon was named by Maurice Bloomfield (1896) in connection with Vedic Sanskritrujā́nāḥ, which he derived from *rujāná-nās ‘with broken nose’ through loss of before nās. Haplology is a special case of the Ob…

Cite this page
Chris Golston, “Haplology”, in: Encyclopedia of Ancient Greek Language and Linguistics, Managing Editors Online Edition: First Last. Consulted online on 21 August 2017 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/2214-448X_eagll_SIM_00000475>
First published online: 2013



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