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Bāysong̲h̲or

(187 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, second son of Sulṭān Maḥmūd of Samarḳand, grandson of Sulṭān Abū Saʿīd [ q.v.], born in the year 882/1477-8, killed on 10 Muḥarram 905/17 Aug. 1493. In the lifetime of his father he was prince of Buk̲h̲ārā; on the death of the latter in Rabīʿ II 900/30 Dec. 1494/27 Jan. 1495, he was summoned to Samarḳand. In 901/1495-6, he was deposed for a brief period by his brother Sulṭān ʿAlī and in 903, towards the end of Rabīʿ I November 1497, finally overthrown by his cousin Bābur. Bāysong̲h̲or then betook himself to…

Alti S̲h̲ahr

(142 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, or alta s̲h̲ahr (the word "six" is always written alta in Chinese Turkistān), "six towns", a name for part of Chinese Turkistān (Sin-kiang) comprising the towns of Kuča, Aḳ Su, Uč Turfān (or Us̲h̲ Turfān), Kās̲h̲g̲h̲ar, Yārkand and Ḵh̲otan. It appears to have been first used in the 18th century (cf. M. Hartmann, Der Islamische Orient , i, 226, 278). Yangi Ḥiṣār, between Kās̲h̲g̲h̲ar and Yārkand, is sometimes added as the seventh town (though it also frequently counted as one of the six, in which case either Kuča or Uč Turfān is…

Aḳ Masd̲j̲id

(178 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
“White Mosque”, name of two towns: 1. Town in the Crimea (local pronunciation: Aḳ Mečet), founded in the 16th. century by the k̲h̲āns of the Crimea in order to protect their capital, Bāg̲h̲če Sarāy, from nomad incursions. It was the residence of the crown prince ( kalg̲h̲ay sulṭān ), whose palace was outside the town, according to Ewliyā Čelebi, vii, 638-41. The town was destroyed by the Russians in 1736, and rebuilt in 1784 under the name of Simferopol (although the local population continued to use the Turkish name). 2. A fortress on the Si̊r Daryā, which belonged to the Ḵh̲ānate …

Atek

(162 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, district in Soviet Türkmenistān on the northern slope of the frontier-mountains of Ḵh̲urāsān (Kopet Dag̲h̲), between the modern railway ¶ stations Gjaurs and Dus̲h̲ak. The name is really Turkish, Etek, "edge border" (of the mountain-chain), and is a translation of the Persian name given to this district, viz. Dāman-i Kūh, "foot of the mountain"; but the word is always written Ātak by the Persians. During the Middle Ages no special name for Atek appears to have been in use; being a district of the town of Abīward [ q.v.] it belonged to Ḵh̲urāsān. In the 10th/16th and 11th/17th cent…

Bāyḳarā

(363 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, a prince of the house of Tīmūr, grandson of its founder. He was 12 years old at the death of his grandfather (S̲h̲aʿbān 807/February 1405) so he must have been born about 795/1392-3. His father ʿUmar S̲h̲ayk̲h̲ had predeceased Tīmūr. Bāyḳarā is celebrated by Dawlat-S̲h̲āh (ed. Browne, 374) for his beauty as a second Joseph and for his courage as a second Rustam; he was prince of Balk̲h̲ for a long period. In the year 817/1414 he was granted Luristān, Hamadān, Nihāwand and Burūd̲j̲īrd by S̲h̲āh…

ʿAmr b. al-Layt̲h̲

(429 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, Persian general, brother and successor of Yaʿḳūb b. al-Layt̲h̲ [ q.v.[, the founder of the Ṣaffārid [ q.v.] dynasty in Sid̲j̲istān. Said to have been a mule-driver in his youth, and later on a mason, he was associated with his brother’s campaigns and in 259/873 captured for Yaʿḳūb the Ṭāhirid capital Naysābūr. After Yaʿḳūb’s defeat at Dayr al-ʿĀkūl and subsequent death (S̲h̲awwāl 265/ June 879), ʿAmr was elected by the army as his successor. He made his submission to the caliph, and was invested with the provin…

Bāysong̲h̲or

(38 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, the name of another prince, of the Aḳ-Ḳoyunlū dynasty in Persia, son and successor of Sulṭān Yaʿḳūb; he only reigned for a short period from 896-7/1490-2 and was overthrown by his cousin Rustam. (W. Barthold)

Ḥaydar Mīrzā

(676 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
(his real name was Muḥammad Ḥaydar; as he himself says, he was known as Mīrzā Ḥaydar; Bābur calls him Ḥaydar Mīrzā), a Persian historian, author of the Taʾrīk̲h̲-i Ras̲h̲īdī , born in 905/1499-1500, died in 958/1551 (for his descent see dūg̲h̲lāt ); through his mother he was a grandson of the Čag̲h̲atāy K̲h̲ān Yūnus and a cousin of Bābur. Most of our knowledge of his life is gleaned from his own work; Bābur (ed. Beveridge, p. 11) devotes a few lines to him; the Indian historians Abu ’l-Faḍl and Firis̲h̲ta give some information about his later years. After the assassination of his father (91…

Bālik

(123 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, Turko-Mongol word for “town” = or “castle” (also written bāliḳ and bālig̲h̲ ); appears frequently in compound names of towns, such as Bīs̲h̲bāliḳ (“Five Towns”, at the present day in ruins at Gučen in Chinese Turkestan), Ḵh̲ānbāliḳ (the “Ḵh̲ān’s Town”), Turko-Mongol name for Pekin (also frequently used by European travellers in the middle ages in forms like (Cambalu), Ilibāliḳ (on the River Ili, the modern Iliysk) etc. As the town of Bās̲h̲bāliḳ is mentioned as early as the Ork̲h̲on i…

Abu ’l-K̲h̲ayr

(686 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, ruler of the Özbegs [see uzbeks ] and founder of the power of this nation, descendant of S̲h̲aybān, Ḏj̲uči’s youngest son [see s̲h̲aybānids ], born in the year of the dragon (1412; as the year of the hid̲j̲ra 816/1413-4 is erroneously given). At first he is said to have been in the service of another descendant of S̲h̲aybān, Ḏj̲amaduḳ Ḵh̲ān. The latter met his death in a revolt; Abu ’l-Ḵh̲ayr was taken prisoner, but was released and shortly after proclaimed k̲h̲ān in the territory of Tura (Siber…

Ḳurama

(754 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, according to Radloff ( Versuch eines Wörterbuches der Türk-Dialecte , St. Petersburg 1899, ii, 924) “a Turkish tribe in Turkistan”; the same authority gives the Kirgiz (i.e. Ḳazaḳ) word ḳurama (from ḳura , “to sew together pieces of cloth”) with the meaning “a blanket made of pieces of cloth sewn together”. In another passage ( Aus Sibirien 2, Leipzig 1893, i, 225) Radloff himself says that the Kurama are “a mixed people of Özbegs and Kirgiz” and their name comes from the fact, asserted by the Kirgiz, that “they are made up of patches from many tribes” ( kura to “patch…

ʿAbd Allāh b. Iskandar

(830 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, a S̲h̲aybānid [ q.v.], the greatest prince of this dynasty, born in 940/1533-4 (the dragon year 1532-3 is given, probably more accurately, as the year of the cycle) at Āfarīnkent in Miyānkāl (an island between the two arms of the Zarafs̲h̲ān). The father (Iskandar Ḵh̲ān), grandfather (Ḏj̲ānī Beg) and great-grandfather (Ḵh̲wād̲j̲a Muḥammad, son of Abu ‘l-Ḵh̲ayr [ q.v.]) of this ruler of genius are all described as very ordinary, almost stupid men. Ḏj̲ānī Beg (d. 935/1528-9) had at the distribution of 918/1512-3 received Karmīna and Miyānkāl; Iskandar …

Kučum K̲h̲ān

(538 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, a Tatar K̲h̲ān of Siberia, in whose reign this country was conquered by the Russians. Abu ’l G̲h̲āzī (ed. Desmaisons, 177), is the only authority to give information regarding his origin and his genealogical relation to the other descendants of Čingiz K̲h̲ān. According to this source, he reigned for forty years in “Tūrān”, lost his eyesight towards the end of his life, was driven from his kingdom by the Russians in 1003/1594-5, took refuge with the Mang̲h̲i̊t (Nogay) and died among them. Refer…

K̲h̲ānbaliḳ̊ḳ

(514 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
(usually written K̲h̲ān Bālīḳ), the “K̲h̲ān’s town”, the name of Pekin, the capital of the Mongol Emperors after 1264 in Eastern Turkī and Mongol and afterwards adopted by the rest of the Muslim world and even by Western Europe ( Cambaluc and variants in S. Hallberg, l’Extrême Orient dans la littérature et la cartographie de l’Occident, Göteborg 1906, 105 f.). According to Ras̲h̲īd al-Dīn (ed. Berezin, Trudi̊ Vost . Otd . Ark̲h̲ . Obs̲h̲č . xv, Persian text, 34), Pekin (Chinese, then Čūngdū, i.e. “the middle capital”) was called K̲h̲ānbāli̊ḳ even…

Bāysong̲h̲or

(187 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, deuxième fils du sultan de Samarḳand, petit-fils du sultan Abū Saʿīd [ q.v.], né en 882/1477-78, tué le 10 muḥarram 905/17 août 1499. Il fut prince de Buk̲h̲ārā du temps de son père; à la mort de celui-ci, survenue en rabīʿ II 900/30 déc. 1494-27 janv. 1495, il fut appelé à Samarḳand. En 901/1495-96, il fut, pendant une courte période, dépossédé par son frère le sultan ʿAlī, puis à la fin de rabīʿ I 903/novembre 1497, et définitivement, par son cousin Bābur. Bāysong̲h̲or se rendit à Ḥiṣār où il réussit, av…

Gardīzī

(336 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, Abu Saʿīd ‘Abd al-Ḥayy b. al-ḍaḥḥāk b. Maḥmūd, historien persan qui vivait au milieu du Ve/XIe s. On ne sait rien de sa vie, mais sa nisba indique qu’il était originaire de Gardi̊z [ q.v.]; comme il déclare avoir reçu d’al-Bīrūnī [ q.v.] des renseignements sur des fêtes indiennes, il est possible qu’il ait été son élève. Son ouvrage, intitulé Zayn al-ak̲h̲bār, fut écrit sous le règne du sultan g̲h̲aznawide ʿAbd al-Ras̲h̲īd (440-3/1049-52); il contient une histoire des rois préislamiques de Perse, de Muḥammad et des califes jusqu’en 423/1032, ainsi qu’une…

Ḳurama

(790 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, d’après Radloff ( Versuch eines Wörterbuches der Tüirk-Dialecte, II, St. Pétersbourg 1899, 924) «race de Turcs du Turkestan»; dans son ouvrage, le mot kirghiz (c’est-à-dire ḳazaḳ) ḳurama (de ḳura = coudre ensemble des morceaux d’étoffe) est aussi cité avec le sens de «couverture faite de morceaux d’étoffe cousus ensemble». Dans un autre ouvrage ( Aus Sibirien 2, Leipzig 1893,1, 225), Radloff lui-même dit que les Ḳurama sont un peuple formé par «un mélange d’Özbeks et de Kirghiz» et que leur nom vientt d’après ce que disent les Kirghiz eux-mêmes, du fai) qu’ils sont formés ( kura = coudre…

K̲h̲ānbali̇ḳ

(471 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
(écrit ordinairement Ḵh̲ān Bālīḳ) «ville du k̲h̲ān», mot turc oriental adopté plus tard par le reste du monde musulman et même par l’Europe occidentale ( Cambaluc et var., dans Hallberg, l’Extrême Orient dans la littérature et la cartographie de l’Occident, Göteborg 1906, 105-6), pour désigner Pékin, résidence de l’empereur mongol depuis 1264. Selon Ras̲h̲īd al-din (éd. Berezin, Trudi̊ Vost. Otd. Ark̲h̲. Obs̲h̲č.. XV, texte persan, 34), Pékin (chin. d’alors Čūngdū, c’est-à-dire «capitale du milieu» était nommé auparavant Ḵh̲ānbali̊ḳ par les Mongols et con…

Aḳ Masd̲j̲id

(177 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, «Mosquée blanche», nom de deux villes: 1 — Ville de Crimée (prononciation locale: Ak Mecet), fondée au XVIe siècle par les Ḵh̲āns de Crimée pour protéger leur capitale, Bāg̲h̲če Sarāy, des incursions des nomades. Elle fut la résidence du prince héritier ( Kalg̲h̲ay sulṭān) dont le palais se trouvait en dehors de la ville, d’après Ewliyā Čelebi, VII, 638-41. La cité fut détruite par les Russes en 1736, et rebâtie en 1784 sous le nom de Simferopol (mais la population locale continue d’employer le nom turc). 2 — Forteresse sur le Siʾr Daryā, faisant partie du k̲h̲ānat de Ḵh̲ūḳand. …

Atek

(164 words)

Author(s): Barthold, W.
, district du Turkmenistan soviétique occupant le versant septentrional de la chaînefrontière du Ḵh̲urāsān (Kopet Dag̲h̲), entre les stations de chemin de fer actuelles de Gjaurs et de Dus̲h̲ak. Le nom est en réalité le turc Etek «bord, lisière» (de la chaîne de montagnes), traduction du nom persan de la même région Dāman-i Kūh «pied de la montagne»; cependant les Persans écrivent toujours ce mot Ātak. Il ne semble pas qu’au moyen âge on eût l’habitude de désigner ce territoire par un nom spécial. L’Atek, en qualité de district de la ville d’Abīward [ q.v.], dépendait du Ḵh̲urāsān. Aux Xe/XVI…
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