Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Jomier, J." ) OR dc_contributor:( "Jomier, J." )' returned 36 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Fuʾād al-Awwal

(705 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, king of Egypt. Aḥmad Fuʾād was born in the Gizeh palace on 26 March 1868, of a Circassian mother. In 1879 his father, the Khedive Ismāʿīl, who had been deposed by the Sublime Porte, took him with him into exile. He studied in Geneva and Turin, and in 1885 entered the Italian military academy. At Rome in 1887, as a second-lieutenant in the artillery, he frequently visited the Italian royal family. Having been Ottoman military attaché at Vienna, he finally returned (1892) to Egypt after a stay a…

Institut D’égypte

(851 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, one of the centres of intellectual and scientific life in present-day Cairo. Its history is in fact that of two separate institutes. (a) The first was the Institut d’Égypte founded by Bonaparte in Cairo, under the presidency of Monge, on 20 August 1798 (3 Fructidor). Its creation had been made possible by the existence in Bonaparte’s expedition of a “Commission of the Sciences and the Arts”, in effect an intellectual general staff which Bonaparte had decided should accompany him when he left France. The Institut d’É…

Būlāḳ

(393 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, a small town quite close to the Cairo of Mamlūk and Ottoman times, and its port on the Nile for traffic with Lower Egypt. It was built on the sand which the Nile left when its bed shifted one to one-and-a-half kilometres westwards between the time of Saladin and the 8th/14th century [see al-kāhira ]. It was separated from Cairo by the Nāṣirī canal, dug in 725/1325 by the sultan Muḥammad b. Ḳalāʾūn, who encouraged people of affluence to build their villas ( manẓara ) at Būlāḳ, to which were added later mosques, ḥammāms , etc. The customs transferred there from Cairo…

Fikrī

(346 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, ʿAbd Allāh Pas̲h̲a , an Egyptian statesman, poet and prose-writer, regarded as one of the authors who have helped to give a simpler, more modern character to Arabic literary style. Born in 1250/1834 in Mecca where his father, an Egyptian officer, was serving, and later brought up in Cairo, he studied at al-Azhar and consorted with the Ṣūfīs. From 1267/1851 he was an administrative official and attracted the attention of Khedive Ismāʿīl who, in 1284/1866, chose him to teach Ar…

Amīr al-Ḥād̲jd̲j̲

(538 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, leader of the caravan of pilgrims to Mecca. In 9/630, after which date non-Muslims were excluded from the ḥad̲j̲d̲j̲ , the Prophet nominated Abū Bakr to conduct the pilgrimage and to prevent pagans from taking part in it. In 10/631 he presided over it himself. There-after this duty belonged directly to the caliphs, who either undertook it themselves or nominated an official to act in their place (e.g. the Governor of Mecca or Medina, a high official etc.). When the authority of the Caliph wa…

al-Azhar

(9,210 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
( al-ḏj̲āmiʿ al-azhar ). This great mosque, the ‘brilliant one’ (a possible allusion to Fāṭima al-Zahrāʾ, although no ancient document ¶ confirms this) is one of the principal mosques of present-day Cairo. This seat of learning, obviously Ismāʿīlī from the time of its Fāṭimid foundation (4th/9th century), whose light was dimmed by the reaction under the Sunnī Ayyūbids, regained all its activity—Sunnī from now on—during the reign of Sultan Baybars. Its influence is due on the one hand to the geographical and politic…

al-Manār

(1,755 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, a journal of Muslim thought and doctrine which appeared in Cairo from 1898 to 1940. Its work was the counterpart of that of a printing-house, of the same name, which, besides its other publications, re-issued articles previously published in the review, such as the famous modern commentary on the Ḳurʾān ( Tafsīr al-Manār ). Without forming part of any particular school, the Manār subscribed to the reformist line of the salafiyya [ q.v.]; this movement of cultural resistance towards colonial encroachment sought to restore to Islam its former power and to re-establis…

al-Fusṭāṭ

(1,961 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, the first city to be founded in Egypt by the Muslim conquerors and the first place of residence of the Arab governors. It was built on the east bank of the Nile, alongside the Greco-Coptic township of Babylon or Bābalyūn [ q.v.], traces of which are still preserved in the ramparts of the Ḳaṣr al-S̲h̲amʿ. A bridge of boats, interrupted by the island of al-Rawḍa [ q.v.], linked the Ḳaṣr with the city of Giza (al-D̲j̲īza) on the other bank of the Nile. Al-Fusṭāṭ was partly built beside the river, which at that time followed a more easterly course, and partly on …

al-Falakī

(245 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, Maḥmūd Pas̲h̲a , was born in 1230/ 1815 at al-Ḥiṣṣa (province of al-G̲h̲arbiyya), and received his early schooling in Alexandria. He subsequently attended, firstly as a pupil, and then as an officer-instructor, the polytechnic school at Būlāḳ (Muhandisk̲h̲āne) founded by Muḥammad ʿAlī. In 1850-1 he was sent to Paris, to specialize in astronomy under Arago. He returned to Cairo in 1859. Afterwards he directed the team which, on the orders of the Khedive Saʿīd, mapped Egypt. H…

Dikka

(192 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, or dikkat al-muballig̲h̲ . During the prayer on Fridays (or feast-days) in the mosque, a participant with a loud voice is charged with the function of muballig̲h̲ . While saying his prayer he has to repeat aloud certain invocations to the imām, for all to hear. In mosques of any importance he stands on a dikka . This is the name given a platform usually standing on columns two to three metres high, situated in the covered part of the mosque between the miḥrāb and the court. In Cairo numerous undated platforms are to be found. The oldest dated inscription, with the word d-k-t, dates back to Sulṭā…

Ibrāhīm b. ʿAlī b. Ḥasan al-Saḳḳāʾ

(480 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, Egyptian teacher and preacher, whose father’s family came from the village of S̲h̲abrāk̲h̲ūm (formerly the markaz of Zifta, now that of Ḳuwaysna in Lower Egypt). He himself was born in 1212/1797 in Cairo, where he was to spend his whole life. After he had followed the course of studies at the kuttāb and then at al-Azhar (S̲h̲āfiʿī rite) until 1234/1819, his whole career was spent as a teacher at al-Azhar. His biographers give the titles of his works and mention his zeal for work and for reading, but in fact little is known…

Fuʾād al-Awwal

(669 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, roi d’Égypte. Aḥmad Fuʾād naquit au Palais de Guizeh le 26 mars 1868, d’une mère circassienne. En 1879, son père, le khédive Ismāʿīl, destitué par la Sublime Porte, l’emmena en exil. Il fit ses études à Genève et Turin, et entra, en 1885, à l’Académie militaire italienne. Sous-lieutenant d’artillerie à Rome (1887), il fréquenta la famille royale d’Italie. Attaché militaire ottoman à Vienne, il revint ensuite en Égypte (1892) après un séjour à Constantinople. Comme prince, il accepta d’être le …

al-Fusṭāṭ

(1,888 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, première cité fondée en Égypte par les conquérants musulmans et premier lieu de résidence des gouverneurs arabes. Elle fut élevée sur la rive orientale du Nil, à côté de l’agglomération gréco-copte de Babylone ou Bābalyūn [ q.v.] dont les remparts du Ḳaṣr al-S̲h̲amʿ conservent encore aujourd’hui le souvenir. Un pont de bateaux, coupé par l’île d’al-Rawḍa [ q.v.], reliait le Ḳaṣr à la cité de ¶ Guizeh (al-Ḏj̲īza). sur l’autre rive du Nil. Al-Fusṭāṭ fut installée en partie contre le fleuve qui coulait alors plus à l’Est et en partie sur des hauteurs désertique…

Institut Dʾégypte

(821 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, un des foyers de vie intellectuelle et scientifique qui se trouvent au Caire à l’heure actuelle. Son histoire est en fait celle de deux instituts distincts. I. — Le premier fut l’Institut d’Égypte fondé par Bonaparte au Caire, sous la présidence de Monge, le 20 août 1798 (3 fructidor). Sa création avait été rendue possible par l’existence, dans l’expédition, d’une «Commission des Sciences et des Arts», véritable État-Major intellectuel dont Bonaparte avait voulu s’entourer au départ de la France. L’Institut d’Égypte tenai…

Amīr al-Ḥād̲j̲d̲j̲

(500 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, chef de la caravane des pèlerins de la Mekke. En 9/630, année à partir de laquelle les non-musulmans furent exclus du ḥad̲j̲d̲j̲, le Prophète désigna Abū Bakr pour conduire le pèlerinage et empêcher les païens d’y participer. En 10/631, il le présida en personne. La charge dépendit ensuite directement des califes qui l’assumaient lorsqu’ils étaient présents ou désignaient un titulaire à leur place dans le cas contraire (gouverneur de la Mekke ou de Médine, haut fonctionnaire, etc.). Lorsque l’autorité du calife éta…

Dikka

(192 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, ou dikkat al- muballig̲h̲. Lors de la prière du vendredi à la mosquée (ou celle des fêtes), un assistant à la voix forte est chargé de la fonction de muballig̲h̲. Tout en faisant sa prière, il doit répéter à haute voix certaines invocations de l’imām afin que tous les entendent. Dans les mosquées un peu importantes, il se place sur la dikka. On appelle ainsi une plate-forme supportée en général par des colonnes de 2 à 3 mètres de haut qui est située dans la partie couverte de la mosquée, entre le miḥrāb et la cour. Au Caire, on trouve de nombreuses plates-formes non datées. La plus an…

al-Falakī

(219 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, Maḥmūd Pas̲h̲a, né en 1230/1815 à al-Ḥiṣṣa (province d’al-G̲h̲arbiyya), alla d’abord à l’école à Alexandrie, fréquenta ensuite, comme élève, puis comme officier instructeur, l’école polytechnique de Būlāḳ fondée par Muḥammad ʿAlī (Muhandisk̲h̲āne). En 1850-51, il fut envoyé à Paris, auprès d’Arago, se spécialiser dans l’astronomie. Il revint au Caire en 1859. H dirigea ensuite l’équipe qui, sur l’ordre du Khédive Saʿīd, dressa la carte de l’Égypte. Il vécut assez pour voir le tout à peu près ach…

al-Azhar

(8,495 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
(al-Ḏj̲amiʿ al-Azhar). Cette grande mosquée, la «brillante» (allusion possible à Fāṭima al-Zahrāʾ, mais aucun document ancien ne le confirme) est une des principales mosquées du Grand-Caire actuel. Foyer d’enseignement, évidemment ismāʿīlien, dès sa fondation par les Fāṭimides (IVe/Xe siècle), mise en veilleuse par réaction sous les Ayyūbides sunnites, elle reprit toute son activité, désormais sunnite, sous le règne du sultan Baybars. Son prestige est dû pour une part à la place géographique et politique que le Caire occupe dans le…

Fikrī

(346 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, ʿAbd Allāh Pas̲h̲a, homme d’État, poète et prosateur égyptien, considéré comme l’un des écrivains qui ont contribué à donner au style arabe une allure plus simple et moderne. Né en 1250/1834 à la Mekke où son père, officier égyptien ¶ était en service, élevé ensuite au Caire, il fit ses études à al-Azhar et fréquenta des Ṣūfis. Fonctionnaire à partir de 1267/1851, il fut remarqué par le khédive Ismāʿīl qui le chargea, en 1284/1867, d’enseigner l’arabe, le turc et le persan à ses fils Tawfīḳ, Ḥasan et Ḥusayn. Ses biographes le présen…

Būlāḳ

(360 words)

Author(s): Jomier, J.
, petite cité toute proche du Caire mamlūk et ottoman, et son port sur le Nil pour le trafic avec la Basse-Égypte. Elle fut construite sur les sables que laissa le Nil lorsque son lit se déplaça de 1 à 1 km. 1/2 vers l’Ouest entre l’époque de Saladin et le VIIIe/XIVe siècle [voir al-Ḳāhira]. Elle était séparée du Caire par al-Ḵh̲alīd̲j̲ al-nāṣirī, ¶ creusé en 725/1325 par le sultan Muḥammad b. Ḳalāʾūn qui encouragea les grands à bâtīr à Būlāḳ des maisons de plaisance ( manẓara), complétées ensuite par mosquées, ḥammāms, etc. La douane du Caire s’y transporta. Vers 1800, Būlāḳ comptait…
▲   Back to top   ▲