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Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Koller, Edith" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Koller, Edith" )' returned 4 results. Modify search

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Name day

(846 words)

Author(s): Koller, Edith
1. ConceptName days and birthdays are “anniversaries shared collectively but celebrated individually” and located in the calendar [7. 79]. They became popular celebrations in the early modern period (Festival), with name days becoming distinctly Catholic in tone and birthdays distinctly Protestant. The celebration of the name day is based on a cyclical concept of time. The festivity is not focused on the individual, but on the annual return of the memory of the saint whose name the day marks. In contrast, the c…
Date: 2020-04-06

Calendar reform

(1,632 words)

Author(s): Koller, Edith
1. Background The Christian calendar, a hybrid of solar and lunar reckoning, combines two functions. First, it serves the reckoning of time (Time, reckoning of) on an astronomical basis (date reckoning). Secondly, it facilitates the reckoning of religious festival. In Christian chronology and computus (the science of calendar reckoning), it was vital to have as astronomically exact a calendar as possible in order to calculate correctly the church holidays, which were tied to the course of the sun …
Date: 2019-10-14

Night

(980 words)

Author(s): Koller, Edith
1. Introduction Night – the time between sunset and sunrise, or the period without sunlight (Sun and Moon; Darkness) – varies in extent according to season and latitude. Experiences of night in early modern Europe consequently also varied greatly. Based on the medieval tradition, however, the early modern night still basically comprised a period of time qualitatively different in all respects from the bright daytime, with its own laws, customs, and symbolic signature (Day, course of) [1]. The western, Christian view of night was informed by Christian light symbolism.…
Date: 2020-04-06

Hour

(1,188 words)

Author(s): Koller, Edith
1. Definition As well as a precise unit of time and a synonym for “time of day” (e.g. “at a late hour”), hour can also be used figuratively to denote a particular time (e.g. “witching hour”), a momentous or fateful event (“hour of victory,” “hour of need”), or a vague period of time [2]. The modern definition as a twenty-fourth part of a day became established during the early modern period. A distinction is made between hours of equal length (Latin horae aequinoctiales, “equinoctial hours” - named after the length of hours on the vernal and autumnal equinoxes) and hours of unequal length ( horae…
Date: 2019-10-14