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Rhinthon

(218 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[English version] (Ῥίνθων). Dichter lit. Phlyaken-Stücke (von denen er 38 [1. test. 2 und 3] geschrieben haben soll) aus Syrakus [1. test. 1], zur Zeit Ptolemaios' [1] I. (322-283 v. Chr., König seit 305) [1. test. 3] in Tarent [1. test. 2 und 3] tätig. Von neun erh. Titeln sind acht als Tragödienparodien (zu Stücken des Euripides [1]: Ἀμφιτρύων/ ‘Amphitryon, Ἡρακλῆς/‘Herakles, Ἰφιγένεια ἁ ἐν Αὐλίδι/‘Iphigeneia in Aulis, Ἰφιγένεια ἁ ἐν Ταύροις/ ‘Iphigeneia im Taurerland, Δοῦλος Μελέαγρος/‘Meleagro…

Bentley, Richard

(1,639 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther
Brit. Klass. Philologe und Theologe. Geb. am 27. 1. 1662 in Oulton bei Leeds, gest. am 14. 7. 1742 in Cambridge. Ab 1676 Studium am St. John’ s College, Cambridge; 1680 Bachelor of Arts; 1683 Master of Arts. 1690 Ordination; 1696 Doctor Theologiae. 1700 Übernahme der Leitung des Trinity College in Cambridge. Werdegang B., Sohn eines kleinen Landbesitzers, besuchte nach privatem Lateinunterricht bei der Mutter die Lateinschule in Wakefield und wurde schon im Alter von 14 Jahren an die Univ. Cambridge geschickt, wo er mit 18 Jahren seinen B. A.…

Wood, Robert

(611 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther
Brit. Privatgelehrter und Politiker. Geb. 1716 oder 1717 in Riverstown Castle (nahe Dublin), gest. am 9. 9. 1771 in Putney (nahe London). 1730–1732 (?) an der Univ. Glasgow; 1738 an der Univ. Padua; danach verschiedene Reisen im Mittelmeerraum und Europa. 1756–1763 und 1768–1770 Under Secretary of State. Ab 1761 Parlamentsabgeordneter. Werdegang, Werk und Wirkung W., Sohn eines presbyterianischen Pfarrers, studierte in Glasgow und Padua und unternahm 1742 und 1743 seine ersten größeren Reisen im östl. Mittelmeerraum. Zusammen mit James Dawkins, J…

Lukian (Lukianos von Samosata)

(3,259 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther
A. Lukian und sein Werk B. Wahre Geschichten C. Totengespräche A. Lukian und sein Werk Lukian wurde um 120 n.Chr. in Samosata am Euphrat geboren. Nach eigener Darstellung erlernte er die griech. Rhetorik in einem ihrer damaligen Zentren an der Westküste Kleinasiens (wahrscheinlich in Ephesos oder Smyrna) und war anschließend einige Jahre als ›Sophist‹ (d. h. als wandernder professioneller Vortragskünstler) u. a. in Italien und Gallien tätig, wandte sich dann von der typischen Laufbahn und Produktion damaliger …

Parasite

(615 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] (παράσιτος/ parásitos; Latin parasitus). The Greek word parásitos was initially a designation for temple servants who participated in banquets in honour of the respective deity (cf. Ath. 6,234c-235e), and also for others who enjoyed official dining (Plut. Solon 24,5; cf. [7. 12]). It was Athenian comedy writers who transferred the term, perhaps before the middle of the 4th cent. BC, to stage figures who tried to obtain meals at other people's tables by all means possible (witty conversat…

Chionnes

(39 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] (Χιόννης; Chiónnēs). Writer of comedies, from 1st cent. BC Thebes; known only from inscriptions; he was victor at the Amphiareia and the Rhomaea in Oropus [1. test.]. Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 PCG IV, 1983, 77.

Sciras

(88 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] (Σκίρας/Skíras). Poet of 'Italic comedy' [1. test. 1] from Tarentum, who in a late record [1. test. 2] is, along with the phlyakes poet Rhinthon and the poet (of Menippian satire?) Blaesus named as a Pythagorean, which is not very credible. Of his work, only two iambic trimeters from the mythological play Μελέαγρος (Meléagros) have survived, a parody of Eur. Hipp. 75f. Hardly any clues exist regarding S.' biographical dates. He is usually associated with Rhinthon (c. 300 BC) Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 CGF 190.

Phlyakes

(281 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] (Φλύακες; Phlýakes). According to the Hellenistic historian Sosibius Laconus (FGrH 595 F 7) the usual term in Graeca Magna for the performers of a local variety of Doric folk burlesque. In antiquity the name is usually derived from φλυαρεῖν/ phlyareîn, 'talk nonsense' (Hsch. s.v.; cf. Poll. 9,149). A derivation from φλέω/ phléō, 'teem, abound' is probably more correct. Phleon (and similar forms) is an old epithet for Dionysus as god of vegetation [2]. Since the late 19th cent. [4. 52], the P. plays have been connected with the representations of comic …

Chaerion

(51 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] Writer of comedies, attested only epigraphically; he evidently once won first prize at the Attic Dionysia [1. test. *2], and also in 154 BC second place at the Great Dionysia with the play ‘The false self-accuser [1. test. 1]. Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 PCG IV, 1983, 69.

Thymoteles

(32 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] (Θυμοτέλης; Thymotélēs). Athenian comic poet of the late 2nd cent. BC recorded only in inscriptions; nothing is known of his work. Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 PCG 7, 1989, 753.

Archicles

(71 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] [1] see Little-master cup see  Little-master cup Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) [German version] [2] Attic comic poet There is epigraphical evidence only of this Attic writer of comedies who, in 181 BC (earlier than Eudoxus), probably won the agon of comedies at the Great Dionysia [1. test. 2], and was also twice a winner at the Lenaea [1. test. 1]. Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 PCG II, 1991, 537.

Thugenides

(63 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] (Θουγενίδης; Thougenídes). Poet of the Old Comedy (I. C.); it is uncertain whether he was on the list of victors at the Dionysia in fifth place after Cratinus [1. test. *1]. Of his only recorded play, Δικασταί ( Dikastaí, ‘The Judges), two short fragments survive; five other play fragments without titles are also uninformative. Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 PCG VII, 1989, 750-752.

Sannyrion

(126 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] (Σαννυρίων/ Sannyríōn). Attic comedic poet of the end of the 5th cent. BC, mocked by his competitors for his skinniness [1. test. 3]. The titles of three plays and 13 fragments with a total of eight and a half verses have been handed down: the Γέλως ( Gélōs, 'Laughter') featured a talking god (fr. 1) and mocked the tragedian Meletus [3] (fr. 2) and Aristophanes [3] (fr. 5); in the Δανάη ( Danáē), dated to 407-404 BC, Zeus considers what shape would be best for him to get to his Danae and in the process makes fun of the tragedic actor Hegelochus (fr. 8); the Ἰώ ( Iṓ), also on a mythical…

Antheas

(84 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] A bon viveur and poet originally from Lindus in Rhodes, who was the first person to use collated poetic (dithyrambic?) expressions and is said to have written ‘comedies’ as well as many other works; Jacoby (in FGrH 527 F 2) doubts his actual existence. A.'s period cannot be determined more precisely; he is said to have been a ‘relative’ of Cleobulus of Lindus, one of the Seven Sages. Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 SH, 1983, no. 46 2 PCG II, 1991, 307.

Augeas

(42 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] Attic comic poet documented only through a short article in the Suda [1. test.]; the Suda counts him as belonging to the Middle Comedy and lists three titles of plays. Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 PCG IV, 1983, 17.

Pandaetes

(30 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] (Πανδαίτης; Pandaítēs). Attic comic writer of the 3rd cent. BC only attested in inscriptions on the Lenaean victors' list. Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) Bibliography PCG VII, 1989, 100.

Paramonus

(63 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] (Παράμονος; Parámonos). Attic comic writer who won third place at the Dionysia of 183 BC, sixth place at those held in 169 and who was posthumously awarded first place at the Dionysia of 167 [1. test. 1-3]. Only two titles of plays, Ναυαγός (Nauagós; 'the Shipwrecked') and Χορηγῶν ('The Sponsor), are extant. Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 PCG VII, 1989, 101.

Pyrrhen

(32 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] (Πυρρήν; Pyrrhḗn). 4th century BC Attic comic poet, who was victorious at the Lenaea on one occasion; nothing else is known. Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) Bibliography PCG VII, 1989, 583.

Anaxandrides

(395 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] (Ἀναξανδρίδης; Anaxandrídēs). An Attic writer of comedies from Rhodes or [1. test. 1] Colophon (apparently he also produced dithyrambs [1. test. 2]), of whom, thanks to IGUR 218 [1. test. 5], more exact dates are known than of any other of his rivals: from this inscription it is clear that A. was an active theatre poet at least between 376 and 349 BC and also in the years in-between frequently performed; even earlier was the Protesilaus, which reflects the great wedding of the Athenian general Iphicrates to a Thracian princess (an event of the early 380s…

Diverbium

(111 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] With few exceptions [2.220] all scenes in the manuscripts of Plautus’ plays that are written in iambic senarii bear the direction diverbium (cf. Donat. II p. 5 W.), marking those sections of the play to be performed without musical accompaniment (cf. Plautus Stichus 758-768: the metre changes to the iambic senarius during a pause by the flautist). The oldest testimony (Liv. 7,2,10) confirms this. In late antiquity the grammarian Diomedes (1,491,22-24) was alone in taking diverbium in its literal Greek sense of ‘dialogue’ (and  canticum as ‘monologue’ [2. 220]). Nesse…
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