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Jewish Journals in the Islamic World

(18,763 words)

Author(s): Rachel Simon
ADEN Aden Niv Geʾulah; Hebrew; 1949; Organ of the Geʾulah emigrants’ camp. ALGERIA Algiers Adziri; See: L’Israélite Algérien Annuaire du Judaïsme Nord-Africain; French; 1953; single issue; Informative publication of the Jewish Algerian Committee for Social Studies (single issue). L’Anticlérical Juif; French; 1898; monthly; Political monthly, edited by Henry Tubiana. L’Appel; French; 1947–1948; bimonthly; Political, social and literary independent. Bamaavak = Ba-Maʾavaq; French; 1950; single issue; Zionist journal of the Halutz “Dror” movement. Besorot Yisraʾel; See:…

Jebel Nafusa

(1,302 words)

Author(s): Rachel Simon
The oldest Jewish settlements in Libya were in Jebel Nafusa (Nafusa Mountain), also known as al-Jabal al-Gharbī (Ar. Western Mountain) and Adrar n Infusen (Ber.). The region extends some 170 kilometers (106 miles) southwest of Tripoli to the Tunisian border, and includes the areas around Yefren, Gharian, and Nalut. It is a mountainous desert plateau interspersed with deep valleys and fertile oases. Due to its rough terrain, governments located in the coastal areas historically found Jebel Nafusa…

Journalism

(7,211 words)

Author(s): Olga Borovaya | Jaleh Pirnazar | Rachel Simon
1. Middle East and North Africa Jewish journalism in the Middle East and North Africa began in 1842 with the Ladino weekly La Buena Esperansa in Izmir (Smyrna). Between then and the end of the twentieth century, over eight hundred Jewish newspapers and periodicals were published in the region, many quite short-lived. Published by and about Sephardim and Mizraḥim, they appeared in regional, Jewish, and European languages, in a variety of formats and frequencies, differed great in longevity, and covered a wide range of t…
Date: 2015-09-03

Shami, Yitzḥaq

(741 words)

Author(s): Rachel Simon
Born in Hebron, Yitzḥaq Shami (1888–1949) was the son of Eliyahu Sarwi, a textile merchant from Damascus who was known as ash-Shami (“the Damascene”).  As a adult he adopted his father’s sobriquet as his literary and legal surname. Shami grew up bilingual, speaking Arabic with his father and Ladino (see Judeo-Spanish) with his mother, a native of Hebron who belonged to the Sephardic Castel family. He became familiar with the daily life of the Arab villagers and Bedouins of the Hebron region because of his father’s b…
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