Context of Scripture Online

Search

Your search for 'tei_subject:"Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions"' returned 51 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Tiglath-pileser III (2.117)

(43 words)

Contributor(s): Hallo, William W.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary The Calaḫ Annals The Iran Stela Summary Inscription 4 Summary Inscription 7 Summary Inscription 8 Summary Inscription 9-10 Summary Inscription 13 Tiglath-pileser III (2.117)

Ninurta-kudurrī-uṣur — Suḫu Annals (#18) (2.115C)

(698 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary Inscribed on a stone stela discovered on the island of ʿĀnā, this text describes a revolt of the city of Anat (before the days of Ninurta-kudurrī-uṣur) and the subsequent disaster when “the Assyrian” took action against the city. It records Ninurta-kudurrī-uṣur’s restoration of the city, emphasizing his goodness and kindness. Ninurta-kudurrī-uṣur — Suḫu Annals (#18) (2.115C) ( lines i.1–5) I, Ninurta…

Summary Inscription 4 (2.117C)

(1,342 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary Incised on fragmentary pieces of an apparent pavement slab, this summary inscription was discovered in excavations at Nimrud and left in situ. It is preserved in squeezes that are no longer extant. Thought originally to be part of the Tiglath-pileser’s Annals (note Luckenbill  ARAB 1:§§ 815–819 and Oppenheim  ANET 283), Wiseman (1956:118) recognized correctly the text’s affinity to Summary Inscriptions 1 and 9. S…

Esarhaddon (2.120)

(422 words)

Author(s): Hallo, William W.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary Sennacherib’s destruction of Babylon (see  COS COSB.2.119E) was condemned by the city’s later Chaldaean rulers. Nabo-polassar, the founder of the Chaldaean Dynasty, declared war on the Assyrians and saw their destruction as just retribution (Gerardi 1986); Nabonidus, the last king of the Dynasty, also considered Sennacherib’s assassination as evidence of divine retribution ( ANET 309; Beaulieu 1989:105…

Sennacherib (2.119)

(45 words)

Contributor(s): Hallo, William W.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary Sennacherib’s First Campaign: Against Merodach-baladan Sennacherib’s Siege of Jerusalem Sennacherib — Lachish Relief Inscription Sennacherib: the “Azekah” Inscription Sennacherib: the Capture and Destruction of Babylon Sennacherib (2.119)

Tell Sheik Hammad Stela (2.114D)

(299 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary This fragmentary text (× cm) is inscribed on a broken black basalt stela found in 18791 at Tell Sheik Hammad (ancient Dūr-Katlimmu).2 The fragment also preserves a partial relief of the king’s portrait and divine symbols. Tell Sheik Hammad Stela (2.114D) ( lines 1–2) [Adad-nirari, the great king,] the mighty [king], king of the universe, king of Assyria, son of Šamši-Adad, [king of the uni…

Summary Inscription 7 (2.117D)

(847 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary This inscription is written on about half of a large tablet (23.×.5+ cm) which though it bears the label K 3751, was most probably discovered at Nimrud. The most detailed of Tiglath-pileser’s summary inscriptions, it was likely composed in or shortly after his 17th palû (regnal year) (i.e., 729 bce) (Tadmor 1994:154, 238–259). It preserves the only complete building account of Tiglath-pileser from Calah. Summary …

Adad-nirari III (2.114)

(49 words)

Contributor(s): Hallo, William W.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary Antakya Stela Pazarcik / Maraş Stela Orthostat Slab of Unknown Provenance Tell Sheik Hammad Sabaʾa Stela Tell al Rimah Stela Calah Orthostat Slab Stela of Sammuramat (Semiramis) Adad-nirari III (2.114)

The Die (Pūru) of Yaḫali (2.113I)

(711 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary In ancient Assyria, the system of dating was by eponym (see  COS COSB.1.136). Each year was named after the līmu, “eponym,” who was a high officer of state. Inscribed clay cubes were used as dice for casting lots to determine the eponyms. This die (× x 28 mm) belonged to Yaḫali, an official of Shalmaneser III. He held the office of eponym twice during Shalmaneser’s reign (833 and 824 bce). The use of lots for many leg…

Officials’ Inscriptions (2.115)

(180 words)

Contributor(s): Hallo, William W.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary The recent discoveries of cuneiform tablets from the Middle Euphrates, combined with older known documents, have enabled a more comprehensive picture to emerge of the situation in the Assyrian state during the eighth century bce. During this period, Assyrian influence had so declined that the cohesive political entity represented in the rulers Aššur…

Sennacherib: the “Azekah” Inscription (2.119D)

(615 words)

Author(s): Cogan, Mordechai
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary The remains of twenty-one lines of a tablet, one fragment of which (K 6205) was formerly ascribed to Tiglath-pileser III ( ANET 282b), the other (82–3–23, 131) to Sargon. The reference to the Judean city of Azekah, as well as the name of Hezekiah (partially restored) definitively set the location of the battles in Judah, but there is still some question as to their date.…

Pavement Inscription 4 (2.118G)

(233 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary The text was inscribed on a pavement slab for the gates at Dūr-Šarrukīn (Khorsabad). Pavement Inscription 4 (2.118G) ( lines 31–41) (Sargon II) … who conquered Samaria and the entire land of Bīt-Ḫumria (Israel);1 who plundered Ashdod (and) Šinuḫtu,2 who caught the Ionians3 like fish in the middle of the sea; who deported the Kasku, all of Tabal, and Ḫilakku; who drove away Mita (Mi…

The Annals (2.118A)

(1,411 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary In very early excavations (1843–44), P. E. Botta uncovered fourteen large rooms of the palace of Sargon II1 at ancient Dūr-Šarrukīn (modern Khorsabad). The doorways and walls of these rooms were adorned with slabs having sculptured reliefs along with inscriptions. Further excavations were undertaken at the site by T. V. Place in 1852–54. In connection with the ear…

Summary Inscription 13 (2.117G)

(532 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary This inscription is engraved on a poorly preserved colossal bas-relief from Nimrud that depicts a large figure with a mace. The inscription is incised across the large figure. While a number of scholars have treated the text as a part of Tiglath-pileser’s Annals,1 others have noted its non-chronological elements as evidence of its summary type. In Tadmor’s recent treatment, he suggests that …

Sennacherib — Lachish Relief Inscription (2.119C)

(264 words)

Author(s): Cogan, Mordechai
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary A four-line epigraph, inscribed in a rectangular block to the left of the seated figure of the king reviewing captives filing out of Lachish. The detailed relief,1 which depicts the assault and capture of the Judean city, enjoyed a most prominent position in a suite of rooms in the palace of Sennacherib at Nineveh, so that “a visitor [to the palace] might justifiably conclude…

Aššur Basalt Statue (2.113G)

(407 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary This is a Summary or Display inscription which is incised on the front, left hip and back of a broken basalt statue of Shalmaneser. It was discovered in the 1903 German excavations at the entrance to a Parthian building where it had been moved from its original location at the Tabira Gate. The statue had been broken into two large and many small pieces and the head was missing. The text appears to date to 833 bce based on the…

Orthostat Slab of Unknown Provenance (2.114C)

(309 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary This text is inscribed on a very fragmentary stone slab of unknown provenance. It seems to describe a western campaign of Adad-nirari III that may have included the defeat of Ataršumki of Arpad. Orthostat Slab of Unknown Provenance (2.114C) … […] They drew the yoke of [my lordship. The kings of the extensive land of Ḫatti] who, in the time of Šamši-[Adad, my father, had become strong and…

The Calaḫ Annals (2.117A)

(2,314 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary In the final years of Tiglath-pileser’s reign,1 the royal scribes composed what became the final “full” edition of his Annals, made up of seventeen palû’s (or regnal years). This edition was inscribed between two registers of reliefs on stone slabs already in place decorating the walls of Tiglath-pileser’s palace at Calah (Nimrud). However, the palace was…

Annals: Calaḫ Bulls (2.113C)

(1,210 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary This is a reconstructed recension (Recension D according to Schramm  EAK 2:76–77) based on inscriptions on two monumental bulls found at Calaḫ and supplemented by two small fragments of inscribed stones. The edition apparently dates to 841 bce1 and is the first edition of Shalmaneser’s annals that documents Shalmaneser’s campaign in his eighteenth regnal year against Hazael of Damascus…

The Iran Stela (2.117B)

(710 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary This inscription is incised on a stela from somewhere in western Iran, perhaps Luristan (Levine 1972:11). The exact provenance is unknown. It is the only known stela of Tiglath-pileser III. After his second campaign in the area in his 9th palû (regnal year) (i.e. 737 bce), he set it up on the border of one of the states that he had defeated during that campaign.1 The Iran Stela (2.117B) Subject: Gen 25:13; Isa 21:16–17;…
▲   Back to top   ▲