Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Halm, H." ) OR dc_contributor:( "Halm, H." )' returned 57 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

S̲h̲umayṭiyya

(278 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
or Sumayṭiyya (also S̲h̲umaṭiyya or Sumaṭiyya), a S̲h̲īʿī sect whose name is derived from that of one of its heads, a certain Yaḥyā b. Abi ’l-S̲h̲umayṭ. The sect recognised as imām and successor of D̲j̲aʿfar al-Ṣādiḳ [ q.v.] his youngest son Muḥammad, who not only bore the name of the Prophet but also is said to have resembled him physically. After the failure in 200/815 of the S̲h̲īʿī rebellion of Abu ’l-Sarāyā [ q.v.] in Kūfa against the caliph al-Maʾmūn (al-Ṭabarī, hi, 976 ff.), Muḥammad b. D̲j̲aʿfar, who then lived in Mecca as an old man, was urged by his followe…

Sabʿiyya

(255 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, "Seveners", a designation for those S̲h̲īʿīsects which recognise a series of seven Imāms. Unlike the name It̲h̲nā ʿas̲h̲ariyya or "Twelvers" the term Sabʿiyya does not occur in mediaeval Arabic texts; it seems to have been coined by modern scholars by analogy with the first term. The name is often used to designate the Ismāʿīliyya [ q.v.], but this is not correct, because neither the Bohora nor the Ḵh̲ōd̲j̲a Ismāʿīlīs count seven Imāms. The term can be applied only to the earliest stage of the development of the Ismāʿīlī sect, during which the Ismā…

al-Manṣūra

(607 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, a town in Lower Egypt near Damietta (Dimyāṭ [ q.v.]), and chief place of the mudīriyyat al-Daḳahliyya . The town was founded in 616/1219 by the Ayyūbid sultan al-Malik al-Kāmil [ q.v.] as a fortified camp against the Crusaders, who had conquered Dimyāṭ in S̲h̲aʿbān 616/November 1219. Situated at the fork of the branches of the Nile near Dimyāṭ and Us̲h̲mūm Ṭannāḥ, the town dominated the two most important waterways of the eastern delta and served as an advanced outpost of Cairo. In July/August 1221, the advance of the Crusad…

Rawk

(817 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
(Egyptian pronounciation: rōk ), a word of non-Arabic origin, probably derived from Demotic ruwk̲h̲ , “land distribution”. From the noun is derived an Arabic verb rāka , yarūku . In the language of Egyptian administration, rawk means a kind of cadastral survey which is followed by a redistribution of the arable land. The procedure comprises the surveying ( misāḥa [ q.v.]) of the fields, the ascertainment of their legal status (private property, endowment, crown land, grant, etc.), and the assessment of their prospective taxable capacity ( ʿibra ). Until the f…

D̲j̲aʿfar b. Manṣūr al-Yaman

(494 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, Ismāʿīlī author and partisan of the Fāṭimids [ q.v.]. He was the son of the first Ismāʿīlī missionary in Yaman, al-Ḥasan b. Faraḥ b. Ḥaws̲h̲ab b. Zādān al-Kūfī, known as Manṣūr al-Yaman [ q.v.]. When in the year 286/899 the chief of the Ismāʿīlī propaganda, ʿUbayd Allāh, claimed the imāmate, Manṣūr al-Yaman acknowledged him; the letter by which ʿUbayd Allāh tried to prove his ʿAlid descent has been preserved in D̲j̲aʿfar’s al-Farāʾiḍ wa-ḥudūd al-dīn (see H.F. Hamdani, On the genealogy of Fatimid caliphs, Cairo 1958). When after the death of Manṣūr al-Yaman (302/914-15) his s…

Manūf

(427 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, name of two towns in the Nile delta. 1. Manūf al-Suflā, near the present Maḥallat Manūf in the markaz of Ṭanṭā, in Byzantine times a bishopric in Coptic Panouf K̲h̲īt, in Greek ᾿Ονοṽφις ἡ κάτω. After the Arab conquest, the town became the centre of a kūra [ q.v.] (Ibn K̲h̲urradād̲h̲bih, 82; Ibn al-Faḳīh, 74; al-Yaʿḳūbī, 337), but seems to have disappeared already in the Fāṭimid period (cf. al-Ḳalḳas̲h̲andī, Ṣubḥ , iii, 384). It was replaced by Maḥallat Manūf which, since the administrative reform of the caliph al-Mustanṣir and the latter’s vizier Badr al-D̲j̲amālī [ q.vv.], has belonged …

S̲h̲amsa

(356 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, a jewel used by the ʿAbbāsid and Fāṭimid [ q.vv.] caliphs as one of the insignia of kingship. According to the description of the Fāṭimid s̲h̲amsa , given by Ibn Zūlāḳ (quoted by al-Maḳrīzī, Ittiʿāẓ al-ḥunafāʾ , i, 140-2), it was not a sunshade, as has been guessed (de Goeje, in al-Ṭabarī, Glossarium , p. cccxvi), but a kind of suspended crown, made out of gold or silver, studded with pearls and precious stones, and hoisted up by the aid of a chain. The s̲h̲amsa, therefore, is not to be confounded with the miẓalla [ q.v.] or sunshade which belonged also to the royal insignia. The model of the s̲h̲amsa…

ʿUlyāʾiyya

(278 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, a name applied to a sect of S̲h̲īʿī extremists ( g̲h̲ulāt [ q.v.]), founded by the Kūfan heretic Bas̲h̲s̲h̲ār al-S̲h̲aʿīrī [ q.v.], a contemporary of the Imām Ḏj̲aʿfar al-Ṣādiḳ (d. 148/765 [ q.v.]). According to the Twelver S̲h̲īʿī (Imāmī) heresiographers, this man was repudiated by Ḏj̲ʿfar al-Ṣādiḳ because he deified ʿAlī and assigned to Muḥammad the rôle of ʿAlī’s messenger; he was also accused of preaching libertinism, the denial of divine attributes, and metempsychosis (Saʿd b. ʿAbd Allāh al-Ḳummī, al-Maḳālāt wa ’l-firaḳ , ed. M.Ḏj̲. Mas̲h̲kūr, Tehr…

al-Ḳus̲h̲ayrī

(1,101 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, the nisba of two noted K̲h̲urāsānian scholars. 1. Abu ’l-Ḳāsim ʿAbd al-Karīm b. Hawāzin , theologian and mystic. He was born in 376/986 ¶ in Ustuwā (the region of actual Ḳūčān [ q.v.] on the upper Atrak), the son of a man of Arab descent (from B. Ḳus̲h̲ayr) and a woman from an Arab (from B. Sulaym) dihḳān family. He got the education of a country squire of the time: adab , the Arabic language, chivalry ( furūsiyya ) and weaponry ( istiʿmāl al-silāḥ ). When as a young man he came to Naysābūr with the intention to get the taxes on one of his villages reduced, he became acquainted with the Ṣūfī s̲h̲ayk̲h̲

Zakarawayh b. Mihrawayh

(553 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, one of the earliest Ismāʿīlī missionaries in ʿIrāḳ. In modern literature, the name, a Persian diminutive of Zakariyyāʾ (originally Zakarōye), is often misread as Zikrawayh. Zakarawayh came from the village of al-Maysāniyya near Kūfa and was the son of one of ʿAbdān’s [ q.v.] first missionaries; he propagated the Ismāʿīlī doctrine among the Bedouin of the tribe of Kulayb on the fringes of the desert west of Kūfa. When in 286/899 a schism split the Ismāʿīlī community, he was instrumental in doing away with his master ʿAbdān who had aposta…

al-Wāḳifa

(272 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
or al-Wāḳifiyya , a S̲h̲īʿī sect ( firḳa ) whose adherents maintained that the seventh Imām Mūsā al-Kāẓim (d. 183/799 [ q.v.]) had not died but that God had carried him out of sight ( rafaʿahū ilayhi ), and awaited his return as the Mahdī [ q.v.]. By their Twelver S̲h̲īʿī (Imāmī) opponents they were called al-wāḳifa (“the ones who stand still” or “those who stop, put an end to [the line of Imāms]”, because they let the succession of imāms end with him and contested the transfer of the imāmate to his son ʿAlī al-Riḍā [ q.v.]. The sect is mentioned by Twelver S̲h̲īʿī as well as Sunnī heresiogr…

Sitr

(108 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
“veil”, a curtain behind which the Fāṭimid caliph was concealed at the opening of the audience session ( mad̲j̲lis ) and which was then removed by a special servant ( ṣāḥib/muṭawallī al-sitr ) in order to unveil the enthroned ruler. The sitr corresponded to the velum of the Roman and Byzantine emperors. The holder of the function of ṣāḥib al-sitr, who also served as bearer of the caliph’s sword ( ṣāḥib al-sitr wa ’l-sayf), chamberlain and master of ceremonies, was mostly ¶ chosen from the Slav mamlūks ( ṣaḳāliba [ q.v.]); al-Maḳrīzī, Ittiʿāẓ al-ḥunafāʾ , ii, ed. M.Ḥ.M. Aḥmad, 30, 72, 106, 127. (H…

al-Walīd b. His̲h̲ām

(567 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, Abū Rakwa, a pseudo-Umayyad pretender who led a revolt against the Fāṭimid caliph al-Ḥākim [ q.v.]. He was an Arab, probably of Andalusian origin, who for some time had earned his living as a schoolteacher in al-Ḳayrawān and Miṣr (Old Cairo) and then went into service with the Arab Bedouin clan of Banū Ḳurra (of the Hilāl tribe) whose pasture-grounds were the hilly country of Cyrenaica south-east of Barḳa (modern al-Mard̲j̲); there he taught the boys of the clan to read and write. His nickname Abū Rakwa “the …

Dawr

(482 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
(A. pl. ādwar ), “revolution, period”; the periodic movement of the stars, often coupled with kawr (pl. akwār ), “great period” (see Risāla no. 35 of the Rasāʾil Ik̲h̲wān al-Ṣafāʾ [ q.v.]: Fi’l-adwār wa ’l-akwār ). In the doctrines of the extreme S̲h̲īʿī sects, the period of manifestation or concealment of God or the secret wisdom. The Ismāʿīliyya [ q.v.]; According to the earliest Ismāʿīlī doctrine, history is composed of seven adwār of seven “speaking” ( nāṭiḳ ) prophets, each of whom reveals a new religious law ( s̲h̲arīʿa ): Adam Noah, Abraham, Moses, Jesus…

Nuṣayriyya

(2,951 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, a S̲h̲īʿī sect widely dispersed in western Syria and in the south-east of present day Turkey; the only branch of extreme ( g̲h̲uluww ) Kūfan S̲h̲īʿism which has survived into the contemporary period. 1. Etymology Pliny ( Hist . nat ., v, 81) mentions a Nazerinorum tetrarchia in Coelesyria, situated opposite Apameia, ¶ beyond the river Marsyas (not identified; probably the right-hand tributary of the Orontes passing to the east of the town), but this name is evidently not related to that of the sect. The Nuṣayriyya themselves derive the name from…

al-Ṣāmit

(270 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, "the Silent One", as opposed to al-nāṭiḳ ¶ "the Speaking One", a term used by several extremist S̲h̲īʿī sectarians ( g̲h̲ulāt ) to designate a messenger of God who does not reveal a new Law ( s̲h̲arīʿa ). The pair of terms is found in the notices concerning the doctrines of the Manṣūriyya and Ḵh̲aṭṭābiyya [ q.vv.] sects respectively (Saʿd b. ʿAbd Allāh al-Ḳummī, K. al-Maḳālāt wa ’l-firaḳ , ed. Mas̲h̲kūr, 48, 51). According to the doctrine of the Ḵh̲aṭṭābiyya, Muḥammad was the nāṭiḳ and ʿAlī the ṣāmit ; in the same sense the two terms are used in the earliest treatises of the Ismāʿīliyya [ q.v.]; e.…

Sitt al-Mulk

(849 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, or Sayyidat al-Mulk , Fāṭimid princess, daughter of the fifth Fāṭimid caliph al-ʿAzīz [ q.v.] and half-sister of al-Ḥākim [ q.v.]. She was born in D̲h̲u ’l-Ḳaʿda 359/September-October 970 at al-Manṣūriyya near al-Ḳayrawān to the prince Nizār (the future al-ʿAzīz) by an anonymous umm walad [ q.v.], who is referred to in the sources as al-Sayyida al-ʿAzīziyya (al-Musabbiḥī, Ak̲h̲bār Miṣr , ed. A.F. Sayyid, Cairo 1978, 94, 111; al-Maḳrīzī, Ittiʿāẓ al-ḥunafāʾ, ed. D̲j̲. al-S̲h̲ayyāl et alii, Cairo 1967 ff., i, 271, 292; Ibn Muyassar, Ak̲h̲bār Miṣr, ed. A.F. Sayyid, Cairo 1981, 175)…

Salmāniyya

(233 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, the name applied to a sect of S̲h̲īʿī extremists ( g̲h̲ulāt [ q.v.]) who paid special reverence to the ṣaḥābī Salmān al-Fārisī [ q.v.] and are said to have regarded him as a prophet or even as a divine emanation superior to Muḥammad and ʿAlī b. Abī Ṭālib. The only two references to the sect originate from Rayy and its environs: the Salmāniyya are mentioned by the Ismāʿīlī author Abū Ḥātim al-Rāzī (d. 322/933-4) in his book Kitāb al-Zīna in the chapter on the S̲h̲īʿī sects (not yet printed; cf. Massignon, Opera minora, i, 475-6); in about 220/835 a certain ʿAlī b. al-ʿAbbās al-Ḵh̲arād̲…

Drusen

(378 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
[English Version] Drusen, aus dem Islam hervorgegangene Rel.gemeinschaft, v.a. in Syrien, dem Libanon und Israel, mit starker Diaspora in Amerika. Entstanden Anfang des 11.Jh. in Kairo als chiliastische, antinomistische Bewegung innerhalb der šīcitischen Sekte der Ismailiten (Islam: II., 1.), von der sie als »extremistisch« ausgeschieden wurde. Kern der Lehre ist der Glaube, daß der Schöpfergott in »Perioden der Enthüllung« (daur al-kašf) den Geschöpfen in menschlicher Gestalt erscheint; zu diesen Zeiten besteht die wahre Rel.…

Ibn Ḫaldūn

(147 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
[English Version] (ʿAbdarraḥmān ibn Muḥammad; 7.5.1332 Tunis – 19.3.1406 Kairo), arab. Historiker. I.Ḫ gelangte nach einer wechselvollen Karriere an den Höfen von Fez, Granada und Bougie nach Ägypten, wirkte in Kairo als juristischer Lehrer an der Azhar-Moschee und anderen Hochschulen und amtierte mehrfach als Richter. Sein Hauptwerk ist die »Einleitung« (al-Muqaddima) zu seiner aus älteren Quellen kompilierten Universalgesch., eine Theorie der Zivilisation und Analyse des Entstehens und Verfa…

ʿUlyāʾiyya

(269 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, désignation d’une secte de s̲h̲īʿites extrémistes ( g̲h̲ulāt [ q.v.]) fondée par Bas̲h̲s̲h̲ār al-S̲h̲aʿīrī [ q.v.], un hérétique de Kūfa, contemporain de l’imām Ḏj̲aʿfar al-Ṣādiḳ (m. 148/765 [ q.v]). Selon les hérésiographes duodécimains (imāmites), Bas̲h̲s̲h̲ār fut rejeté par Ḏj̲aʿfar al-Ṣādiḳ car il avait déifié ʿAlī et réduit Muḥammad au rôle de messager de ʿAlī; il était également accusé de prêcher le libertinage, le refus des attributs divins et la métempsychose (Sa’d b. ʿAbd Allāh al-Ḳummī, al-Maḳālāt wa l-firaḳ, édit. M. D̲j̲. Mas̲h̲kūr, Téhéran 1963, 59-60, 63; …

al-Kus̲h̲ayrī

(1,091 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, nisba de deux savants k̲h̲urā- sāniens: I. Abū l-Ḳāsim ʿAbd al-Karīm b. Hawāzin, théologien et mystique, né en 376/986 à Ustuwā (région du Ḳučān [ q.v.] actuel, sur le haut Atrak); fils d’un Arabe descendant des Banū Ḳus̲h̲ayr et d’une femme appartenant à une famille de dihḳāns d’origine arabe (Banū Sulaym), il reçut l’éducation d’un hobereau de son temps: adab, langue arabe, équitation ( furūsiyya) et maniement des armes ( istiʿmāl al-silāḥ). Tout jeune encore, il se rendit à Naysābūr dans l’intention de faire réduire les impôts de l’un de ses villages et fit la connaissance du s̲h̲ayk̲h̲…

al-Ṣamit

(244 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, «le Silencieux», opposé à al-nāṭiḳ, «Celui qui parle», terme utilisé par différentes sectes s̲h̲īʿites extrémistes ( g̲h̲ulāt) pour désigner un messager de Dieu qui n’est pas chargé de révéler une loi ( s̲h̲arīʿa) nouvelle. Ce couple de mots se trouve dans les notices concernant les doctrines des sectes manṣūriyya et k̲h̲aṭṭābiyya [ q. vv.] respectivement (Saʿd b. ʿAbd Allāh al-Ḳummī, K. al-Maḳālāt wa-l-firaḳ, éd. Mas̲h̲kūr, 48, 51). Selon la doctrine des Ḵh̲aṭṭābiyya, Muḥammad était le nāṭiḳ et ʿAlī le ṣāmit. Les deux termes sont employés avec la même acception dans les …

Manūf

(395 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, nom de deux villes du delta du Nil. I. Manūf al-Suflā, près de l’actuelle Maḥallat Manūf, dans le markaz de Ṭanṭā était, à l’époque byzantine, un évêché (copte Panouf Ḵh̲īt, grec ΌυοũφιΣ ἡ κάτω). Après la conquête arabe, la ville devint le centre d’une kūra [ q.v.] (Ibn Ḵh̲urradād̲h̲bih. 82; Ibn al-Faḳīh, 74; al-Yaʿḳūbī, 337), mais elle paraît avoir disparu dès l’époque fāṭimide (cf. al-Ḳalḳas̲h̲andī, Ṣubḥ, III, 384). Elle fut remplacée par Maḥallat Manūf qui, depuis la réforme administrative du calife al-Mustanṣir et de son vizir Badr al-Ḏj̲amālī [ q. vv.], appartient à la province…

S̲h̲umayṭiyya

(264 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
(également Sumayṭiyya, S̲h̲umaṭiyya, Sumaṭiyya), secte s̲h̲īʿite dont le nom est emprunté à un de ses chefs, un certain Yaḥyā b. Abī l-S̲h̲umayṭ La secte reconnaissait comme imām et successeur de Ḏj̲aʿfar al-Ṣādiḳ [ q.v.] son fils cadet Muḥammad, qui non seulement portait le nom du Prophète, mais lui aurait ressemblé physiquement. Après l’échec en 200/815 à Kūfa de la révolte s̲h̲īʿite d’Abū l-Sarāyā [ q.v.] contre le calife al-Maʾmūn (al-Ṭabarī, III, 976 sqq.), Muḥammad b. Ḏj̲aʿfar, qui finissait sa vie à la Mekke, fut pressé par ses adeptes de se proclamer…

Sitt al-Mulk

(806 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, ou Sayyidat al-mulk, princesse fāṭimide, fille du cinquième calife fāṭimide al-ʿAzīz [ q.v.] et demi-sœur d’al-Ḥākim [ q.v.]. Elle naquit en d̲h̲ū l-ḳaʿda 359/septembre-octobre 970 à al-Manṣūriyya, près d’al-Ḳayrawān, du prince Nizār (le futur al-ʿAzīz) et d’une umm walad [ q.v.] anonyme, appelée dans les sources al-Sayyida al-ʿAzīziyya (al-Musabbiḥī, Ak̲h̲bār Miṣr, éd. A. F. Sayyid, Caire 1978, 94, 111; al-Maḳrīzī, Ittiʿāẓ al-ḥunafāʾ, éd. Ḏj̲. al-S̲h̲ayyāl et al., Caire 1967 sqq.; I, 271, 292; Ibn Muyassar, Akh̲bār Miṣr, éd. A. F. Sayyid, Caire 1981, 175). Lorsque sa …

al-Manṣūra

(608 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, ville de Basse-Égypte proche de Damiette (Dimyāṭ [ q.v.]) et chef-lieu de la mudīriyya d’al-Daḳahliyya. La ville a été fondée en 616/1219 par le sultan ayyābide al-Malik al-Kāmil [ q.v.] pour servir de camp fortifié contre les Croisés qui avaient pris Damiette en s̲h̲aʿbān de la même année. Située à l’embranchement de deux bras du Nil de Dimyāṭ et d’Us̲h̲mūm Ṭannāḥ, al-Manṣūra dominait les deux cours d’eau les plus importants du Delta oriental et servait de poste avancé du Caire. En juillet-août 1221, l’avance des Croisés …

S̲h̲amsa

(335 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, pièce de joaillerie utilisée comme insigne de la royauté par les ʿAbbāsides et les Fāṭimides [ q.vv.]. D’après la description de la s̲h̲amsa fāṭimide fournie par Ibn Zūlāḳ (cité par al-Maḳrīzī, Ittiʿāẓ al-ḥunafāʾ, I, 140-2), ce n’était pas un parasol, comme on l’a supposé (de Gœje, dans al-Ṭabarī, Glossarium, p. CCCXVI), mais une sorte de couronne suspendue, faite d’or et d’argent, cloutée de perles et autres pierres précieuses, et maintenue en hauteur grâce à une chaîne. En conséquence, la s̲h̲amsa ne doit pas être confondue avec la miẓalla [ q.v.], ou ¶ ombrelle, qui faisait égalem…

Rawk

(779 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
(forme égyptienne: rōk), mot d’origine non-arabe dérivant probablement du démotique rwk̲h̲, «distribution de la terre». Du nom dérive un verbe «arabe» rāk, yarūk. Dans la langue de l’administration égyptienne, rawk désigne une sorte de relevé cadastral assorti de la redistribution des terres arables. La procédure comprend le métrage ( misāḥa [ q.v.]) des champs, la vérification de leur statut légal (propriété privée, mainmorte, bien de la couronne, don, etc.), et l’estimation de leur rendement fiscal présumé ( ʿibra). Jusqu’à la chute de la dynastie fāṭimide, la charge d…

Nuṣayriyya

(2,737 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, secte s̲h̲īʿite répandue dans la Syrie occidentale et dans le Sud-est de la Turquie actuelle; la seule branche du S̲h̲īʿisme extrémiste ( g̲h̲ulū) kūfien qui ait survécu jusqu’aujourd’hui. — 1. Étymologie. Pline ( Hist. nat. V 81) signale en Coelosyria une Nazerinorum tetrarchia située vis-à-vis d’Apamée, au delà du fleuve Marsyas (non identifié; évidemment l’affluent de droite de l’Oronte à l’Est de la ville), mais ce nom n’a probablement rien à faire avec celui de la secte. Les Nuṣayriyya eux-mêmes font dériver leur nom de celui de l…

Sitr

(100 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, «voile», rideau derrière lequel le calife fāṭimide se dissimulait lors de l’ouverture de la session d’audiences ( mad̲j̲lis) et qui était ensuite ôté par un serviteur spécial ( ṣāḥib/mutawallī l-sitr) afin de dévoiler le souverain régnant. Le sitr correspondait au vélum des empereurs romains et byzantins. Le détenteur de la fonction de ṣāḥib al-sitr, qui était aussi le porte-épée du calife ( ṣāḥib al-sitr wa-l-sayf), son chambellan et son maître des cérémonies, était le plus souvent choisi parmi les mamlūks slaves ( ṣaḳāliba [ q.v.]); al-Maḳrīzī, Ittiʿāẓ al-ḥunafāʾ, II, éd. M. H.…

al-Walīd b. His̲h̲ām

(632 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, Abū Rakwa, un prétendant pseudo-umayyade qui mena une révolte contre le calife fāṭimide al-Ḥākim [ q.v.]. C’était un Arabe, sans doute originaire d’al-Andalus, qui pendant un certain temps avait gagné sa vie comme instituteur à Ḳayrawān et à Miṣr-Fusṭāṭ, puis se mit au service du clan bédouin arabe des Banū Ḳurra (de la tribu Hilāl) dont les pâturages couvraient une région de collines en Cyrénaïque, au Sud-est de Barḳa (actuellement, al-Mard̲j̲); là, il enseigna à lire et à écrire aux enfants du clan. Son sur…

Ḏj̲aʿfar b. Manṣūr al-Yaman

(504 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, auteur ismāʿīlien et partisan des Fāṭimides [ q.v.], fils du premier missionnaire ismāʿīlien au Yémen, al-Ḥasan b. Faraḥ b. Ḥaws̲h̲ab b. Zādān al-Kūfī, connu sous le nom de Manṣūr al-Yaman [ q.v.]. Lorsque, en 286/899, le chef de la propagande ismāʿīlienne, ʿUbayd Allāh, revendiqua l’imamat, Manṣūr al-Yamān prit son parti; la lettre par laquelle ʿUbayd Allāh entreprit d’établir son ascendance ʿalide est reproduite dans al-Farāʾiḍ wa-ḥudūd al-dīn de Ḏj̲aʿfar (voir H. F. Hamdani, On the genealogy of Fatimid caliphs, Caire 1958). Et quand, après la mort de Manṣūr al-Yaman (…

al-Wāḳifa

(271 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
ou al-Wāḳifiyya, secte s̲h̲īʿite ( firḳa) dont les adhérents soutenaient que le septième Imām, Mūsā al-Ḳāẓim (m. 183/799 [ q.v.]), n’était pas mort mais que Dieu l’avait transporté vers lui ( rafaʿahū ilayhi) en dehors de la vue des hommes, et attendaient son retour comme Mahdī [ q.v.]. Ils étaient désignés par leurs opposants s̲h̲īʿites duodécimains ( imāmī comme al-wāḳifa («ceux qui se tiennent immobiles» ou «ceux qui arrêtent ou mettent un terme à [la lignée des Imāms]», parce qu’ils laissaient s’éteindre avec lui la lignée des imāms et contestaient …

Zakarawayh b. Mihrawayh

(584 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, un des premiers missionnaires ismāʿīlites en ʿIrāḳ. Dans les écrits contemporains, ce nom, diminutif persan de Zakariyyāʾ (à l’origine Zakarōye), est souvent lu de façon erronée Zikrawayh. Zakarawayh venait du village d’al-Maysāniyya près de Kūfa, et était le fils d’un des premiers missionnaires à avoir suivi ʿAbdān [ q.v.]. Il diffusa la doctrine ismāʿīlite parmi les bédouins de la tribu de Kulayb, sur les franges du désert à l’Ouest de Kūfa. Quand en 286/899, un schisme scinda en deux la communauté ismāʿīlite, il fut utilisé pour supprimer…

Salmāniyya

(220 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, nom d’une secte d’extrémistes s̲h̲īʿites ( g̲h̲ulāt [).».]) professant une vénération spéciale pour le ṣaḥābī Salmān al-Fārisī [ q.v], qu’ils auraient considéré comme un prophète, voire comme une émanation divine supérieure à Muḥammad et à ʿAlī b. Abī Ṭālib. Les deux seules références à la secte proviennent de Rayy et de ses environs: les Salmāniyya sont cités par l’auteur ismāʿīlien Abū Ḥātim al-Rāzī (m. 322/933-4) dans son ouvrage Kitāb al-Zīna, dans le chapitre sur les sectes s̲h̲īʿites (encore inédit; cf. Massignon, Opera minora, I, 475-6); par ailleurs, vers 220/835, un…

Sabʿiyya

(253 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
, «Septimains», désignation des sectes s̲h̲īʿites qui reconnaissent une série de sept Imâms. Au contraire de l’expression It̲h̲nāʿ-as̲h̲ariyya, ¶ ou «Duodécimains», le mot Sabʿiyya n’apparaît pas dans les textes arabes médiévaux. Il semble avoir été forgé par des savants d’époque moderne par analogie avec le premier. Ce nom est souvent employé pour désigner les Ismāʿīliyya [ q.v.], mais c’est un abus du terme, car ni les Bohoras, ni les Ismāʿīliens k̲h̲ōd̲j̲a ne prennent en compte sept Imâms. Le mot ne peut s’appliquer qu’au premier stade de développ…

Dawr

(476 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
(A., pl. Adwār), révolution, période, mouvement périodique des astres; le terme est ¶ souvent accompagné de kawr (pl. akwār) «grande période» (voir Risāla n° 35 des Rasāʾil Ik̲h̲wān al-Ṣafāʾ [ q.v.]: fī l-adwār wa-l-akwār). Dans la doctrine des sectes s̲h̲īʿites extrémistes, il désigne la période de manifestation ou d’occultation de Dieu ou de la sagesse secrète. D’après la doctrine la plus ancienne des Ismāʿīliens [ q.v.] l’histoire compte sept adwār de sept prophètes parlants ( nāṭiḳ) et dont chacun révèle une nouvelle s̲h̲arīʿa ou loi religieuse: Adam, Noé, Abraham, Moïse,…

Assassinen.

(169 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
[English Version] Lat. »Assissini« oder »Heysessini«, von arab. »al-hašīšīya« (»die Haschischesser«), verächtliche Bez. für den während der Kreuzzüge im syr. Küstengebirge aktiven extremistischen Zweig der šīʿitischen Ismailiten-Sekte. Gegründet 1094 von dem ismailitischen Missionar Ḥasan-i Sabbāḥ (gest.1124) auf der Burg Alamût im Elburs südlich des Kaspischen Meeres, suchte die Sekte durch Anschläge auf hohe Würdenträger des sunnitischen Kalifenreiches, seltener auf prominente Kreuzfahrer, di…

Ayatollah.

(126 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
[English Version] Arab. »Zeichen Gottes«, im šīʿitischen Islam Ehrentitel für Träger höchster geistl. Autorität. Seit dem 14.Jh. als individueller Beiname belegt, wird der Titel erst im 20.Jh. im Rahmen einer sich verfestigenden Hierarchie geistl. Würdenträger terminologisch definiert. Danach stellen die A. die oberste Kategorie der mugˇtahid's dar, jener isl. Gelehrten (ʿulamā ʾ), die durch Studium und Examen zur selbständigen und eigenverantwortlichen Entscheidung (igˇtihād) rel. und rechtliche…

Aga Khan.

(149 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
[English Version] Pers.-türkischer Ehrentitel (»Herr Fürst«). Vom Schah von Persien im Jahre 1828 dem 46. Oberhaupt (imâm) der schiitischen Sekte der Ismailiten in seiner Eigenschaft als Schwiegersohn des Schah verliehen, wird der Titel seitdem von den Imamen der Sekte, die als direkte Nachkommen und rechtmäßige Nachfolger des Propheten Muḥammad gelten, getragen. Der 48. Imam, Sir Muhammad Schah Aga Khan III., geb.1877 in Karatschi, 1885 in Bombay als Imam inthronisiert, trug viel zur Zusammenfa…

Imām

(67 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
[English Version] Imām, arab. »Anführer, Oberhaupt, Meister«, im Islam allg. Bez. für eine rel. Autorität auf ganz unterschiedlichem Niveau, vom Vorbeter in einer Moschee bis zum höchsten Oberhaupt aller Muslime. Im letzteren Sinn bes. bei den Šīciten gebraucht, für deren Lehre die Anerkennung von zwölf Imāmen als den rechtmäßigen Nachfolgern des Propheten Muḥammad konstitutiv ist. Heinz Halm Bibliography W.Madelung, Art. Imāma (EI 2 3, 1971, 1163–1169).

Madrasa

(680 words)

Author(s): Halm, H.
[English Version] (arab., türkisch medrese, »Stätte des Lernens«), Hochschule für die Vermittlung der isl. Jurisprudenz (fiqh). Entstanden im Nordosten Irans oder in Transoxanien, wo 937 der Brand einer M. in Buchara bezeugt ist, war die M. urspr. Lehrstätte eines musl. Privatgelehrten, der hier seine Schüler um sich versammelte. Ob die M. ein Vorbild in den buddhistischen Klöstern (vihara) hatte, ist umstritten; sie scheint eher eine originär isl. Schöpfung zu sein. Eine Stiftung (waqf) aus Privatvermögen konnte der Institution Dauer über den Tod des Gründers hinaus verleihen. U…

al-Muḳtanā

(972 words)

Author(s): Kratschkowsky, I. | Halm, H.
, Bahāʾ al-Dīn , a Druze missionary and author, with his teacher Ḥamza (b. ʿAlī [ q.v.]) founder of the theological system of the Druzes [ q.v.]. During the lifetime of Ḥamza he was the fifth of the five supreme dignitaries ( ḥudūd ) of the Druze hierarchy, with the titles al-D̲j̲anāḥ al-aysar (the Left Wing) and al-Tālī ( the Follower). His “secular” name was Abu ’l-Ḥasan ʿAlī b. Aḥmad al-Sammuḳī. Of his life practically nothing is known. As Arab historians are silent about him (S. de Sacy, Exposé , ii, 320), his own writings are almost the only source (S.N. Makarem, The Druze faith, 26, identiti…

S̲h̲aṭā

(501 words)

Author(s): Wiet, G. | Halm, H.
, a place in Egypt celebrated in the Middle Ages, situated a few miles from Damietta, on the Western shore of the Lake of Tinnīs, now called Lake Manzala. This town existed before the Arab period, since it is mentioned as the see of a bishop (Σάτα). There is no reason for giving credence to the romantic story of the pseudo-al-Wāḳidī, which gives as the founder of this town a certain S̲h̲aṭā b. al-Hāmūk (var. al-Hāmirak), a relative of the famous Muḳawḳis [ q.v.]. This S̲h̲aṭā is presented to us as a deserter from the garrison of Damietta who helped to secure the possession of …

al-S̲h̲arḳiyya

(862 words)

Author(s): Wiet, G. | Halm, H.
, the name of a kūra and of a province (formerly, ʿamal , now mudīriyya ) in Egypt. 1. The kūra of al-S̲h̲arḳiyya which replaced the Byzantine pagarchy of Aphroditopolis, was one of the few districts which received an Arabic name; the latter is explained by its situation on the eastern bank of the Nile. It is difficult to estimate the extent of its territory, which lay immediately south of the capital of the country, al-Fusṭāṭ. The first capital of the kūra, situated on the right bank of the river, was Anṣinā (Antinöe), but the small number (17) of villages in the kūra of al-S̲h̲arḳiyya allows u…

al-S̲h̲arḳiyya

(793 words)

Author(s): Wiet, G. | Halm, H.
, nom d’une kūra et d’une province (anciennement ʿamal, maintenant mudīrīya) en Egypte. 1. La kūra d’al-S̲h̲arḳiyya, qui remplaça la pagarchie byzantine d’Aphroditopolis, fut une des rares circonscriptions ayant reçu une dénomination arabe : son nom s’explique par sa situation sur la rive orientale du Nil. Il est difficile d’évaluer l’étendue de son territoire, qui bornait immédiatement le Sud de la capitale du ¶ pays, Fusṭāṭ. Le premier chef-lieu de kūra, situé sur la rive droite du fleuve, était Anṣinā (Antinoé), mais le nombre restreint des villages de la kūra d’al-S̲h̲arḳiyya (1…

S̲h̲aṭā

(447 words)

Author(s): Wiet, G. | Halm, H.
, localité égyptienne célèbre au moyenâge, située, à quelques milles de Damiette, sur la rive occidentale du lac de Tinnīs, actuellement dénommé lac Manzala. Cette ville existait avant l’époque arabe, puisqu’on la connaět comme siège d’un évêché (Σάτα): rien ne permet donc d’ajouter foi au récit romanesque du pseudo-Wāḳidī, qui cite comme éponyme de cette ville un certain S̲h̲aṭā b. al-Hāmūk (var. al-Hāmirak), parent du fameux Muḳawḳis [ q.v.]. Ce S̲h̲aṭā nous est présenté comme un transfuge de la garnison de Damiette qui contribua à assurer à l’armée musulmane …

al-Muḳtanā

(994 words)

Author(s): Kratschkowsky, I. | Halm, H.
, Bahāʾ al-dīn, missionnaire et auteur druze, fondateur, avec son maître Ḥamza (b. ʿAlī [ q.v.]), du système theologique des Druzes [ q.v.]. Du vivant de Ḥamza, il était le cinquième des cinq dignitaires ( ḥudūd) suprêmes de la hiérarchie druze, et portait les titres d’ al-Ḏj̲anāḥ al-aysar («l’Aile gauche») et d’ al-Tālī («le suivant»). Son nom «laïque» était Abū l-Ḥasan ʿAlī b. Aḥmad al-Sammuḳī. On ne sait pratiquement rien de sa vie; comme les historiens arabes gardent sur lui le silence (S. de Sacy, Exposé, II, 320), ses propres écrits sont à peu près la seule source (S. N. Makarem, The Druz…

Ras̲h̲īd

(688 words)

Author(s): Atiya, A. S. | Halm, H.
, Rosette, ville d’Égypte, lat. 31°24′ N., long. 30°24′ E., sur la rive occidentale de la branche Ouest du Nil. La ville, établie près du site de l’ancienne Bōlbouthiō (en grec Bolbitínē) semble n’avoir pas existé avant la conquête arabe. Même au début du VIIIe siècle J.-O, les papyrus ne mentionnent que Bolbitínē comme comptoir pour les marchandises en provenance de Haute Egypte (Bell, The Aphrodito papyri, 1414, 1. [59], 102, etc.). Jusqu’au IXe siècle J.-C., les bateaux faisaient directement route vers Fuwwa; mais en raison de l’envasement prohibitif de la région,…

Ras̲h̲īd

(730 words)

Author(s): Atiya, A.S. | Halm, H.
, Rosetta , a town in Egypt, situated in lat. 31° 24ʹ N., long. 30° 24ʹ E., on the western bank of the western branch of the Nile. The town which is situated near the site of the ancient Bōlbouthiō (Greek Bolbitínē) seems not to have existed before the Arab conquest. Even at the beginning of the 8th century A.D., the papyri mention only the name of Bolbitínē as emporium for merchandise from Upper Egypt (Bell, The Aphrodite papyri , 1414, 1. [59], 102, etc.). Till the 9th century A.D., ships sailed direct to Fuwwa; but owing to the excessive depositing…

Iran

(5,279 words)

Author(s): Koch, H. | Shaked, S. | Richard, F. | Halm, H.
[English Version] I. Geographie Die Fläche I. beträgt insg. 1 648 000 km 2 und ist somit etwa 4,5mal so groß wie Deutschland. Etwa die Hälfte des Landes ist von Bergen bedeckt; der Demāwand im Elburzgebirge nördlich der Hauptstadt Teheran, ein alter Vulkan, ist mit 5670 m die höchste Erhebung. 8% der Gesamtfläche sind Wald, 55% weite Steppen und 23% Wüsten. Nur 14% der Fläche ist Ackerland. Im Norden grenzt I. an den größten Binnensee der Erde, das Kaspische Meer, im Süden bildet der Pers. Golf die Gre…

Klerus/Klerus und Laien

(3,079 words)

Author(s): Neuner, P. | Schneider, J. | Winkler, E. | Guder, D. | Denis, P. | Et al.
[English Version] I. Europäische christliche Kirchen 1.Katholisch Eine Aufspaltung der Kirche in K. und L. ist vom ntl. Befund her nicht gedeckt. Die Bez. »L.« leitet sich von der Adjektivform laikós des Begriffs λαο´ς/laós, »Volk«, her. Dieser bez. in der LXX das Volk Israel im Gegensatz zu den (heidnischen) Nationen. Im NT umschreibt er an allen wichtigen Stellen das Volk Gottes aus den Glaubenden und unterscheidet dieses vom »Nicht-Volk«. Er differenziert nicht in einander ausschließende Stände innerhalb der Kirche. Charis…

Gnosis/Gnostizismus

(7,374 words)

Author(s): Filoramo, G. | Markschies, C. | Logan, A.H.B. | Koslowski, P. | Leicht, R. | Et al.
[English Version] I. ReligionswissenschaftlichGnosis (G., griech. γνω˜σις/gnō´sis, »Erkenntnis«) ist eine bestimmte Form rel. Erkenntnis, die per se erlöst. Sie hängt nicht von einem bestimmten Objekt ab, sondern hat ihren Wert und ihre Begründung in sich selbst. Sie ist insofern totale Erkenntnis, als sie die Dichotomie zw. Subjekt und Objekt, eigentlich jede Dichotomie, überschreitet, weil sie absolute Erkenntnis des Absoluten ist. In religionshist. Hinsicht hat die in der Regel einer Elite vorbeha…

Miṣr

(46,751 words)

Author(s): Wensinck, A.J. | Bosworth, C.E. | Becker, C.H. | Christides, V. | Kennedy, H. | Et al.
, Egypt A. The eponym of Egypt B. The early Islamic settlements developing out of the armed camps and the metropolises of the conquered provinces C. The land of Egypt: the name in early Islamic times 1. Miṣr as the capital of Egypt: the name in early Islamic times 2. The historical development of the capital of Egypt i. The first three centuries, [see al-fusṭāṭ ] ii. The Nile banks, the island of Rawḍa and the adjacent settlement of D̲j̲īza (Gīza) iii. The Fāṭimid city, Miṣr al-Ḳāhira, and the development of Cairo till the end of the 18t…

Miṣr

(43,144 words)

Author(s): Bosworth, C. E. | Wensinck, A. J. | Becker*, C. H. | Cristides, V. | Kennedy, H. | Et al.
, Égypte. A. — Éponyme de l’Égypte. B. — Premiers établissements islamiques. C. — Miṣr, l’Égypte et sa capitale. 1. — Miṣr, capitale de l’Égypte. 2. — Développement historique de la capitale de l’Égypte. a. — Les trois premiers siècles [voir al-Fusṭāṭ] . b. — Les rives du Nil, l’île de Rawda et l’agglomération voisine de Ḏj̲īza. c. La ville fāṭimide, Miṣr al-Ḳāhira. d. — La citadelle et Le Caire après les Fāṭimides. e. — Monuments [voir al-Ḳāhira]. f. — La ville de 1798 à nos jours, [voir Supplément]. D. — Histoire de la province à l’époque islamique et de l’État égyptien moderne. 1. — L’arrière-…

Leiden

(7,512 words)

Author(s): Mohn, J. | Mürmel, H. | Halm, H. | Fabry, H. | Avemarie, F. | Et al.
[English Version] I. Religionsgeschichtlich 1.AllgemeinLeid ist ein konstruktiv zu gewinnender Begriff der vergleichenden Religionswiss., der grundlegende negative Erfahrungen des Menschen auf eine komparative Ebene erhebt. Leid wird auf dieser interpretierenden Ebene als eine der Grunderfahrungen menschlichen Lebens verstanden. Was als Leid erfahren wird, ist von der jeweiligen Weltdeutung und damit von dem weltdeutenden Religionssystem abhängig. Ab wann etwas in den Rel. als leidvoll bez. wird, …
▲   Back to top   ▲