Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Vajda, G." ) OR dc_contributor:( "Vajda, G." )' returned 72 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Irmiyā

(570 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
(the name is also written Armiyā and Urmiyā, with or without madd ), the prophet Jeremiah (Yirmĕyāhū) of the Old Testament, is not mentioned in the Ḳurʾān although the legends concerning him are connected by traditional exegesis with sura II, 261/259, a “récit édifiant” (R. Blachère), inspired by the apocryphal book “the Paralipomena of Jeremiah” or III Baruch (ed. R. Harris, The Rest of the Words of Baruch , London 1889; G. tr. P. Riessler, Altjüdisches Schrifttum ausserhalb der Bibel , Augsburg 1928, 903-19; reconstruction (in Hebrew) by J. Licht Séfer maʿasey Yirmeyāhū , in Shenaton Ba…

Isrāʾīliyyāt

(931 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, an Arabic term covering three kinds of narratives, which are found in the commentators on the Ḳurʾān, the mystics, the compilers of edifying histories and writers on various levels. 1. Narratives regarded as historical, which served to complement the often summary information provided by the revealed Book in respect of the personages in the Bible ( Tawrāt and Ind̲j̲īl ), particularly the prophets ( Ḳiṣāṣ al-anbiyāʾ ). 2. Edifying narratives placed within the chronological (but entirely undefined) framework of “the period of the (ancient) Israelites” ( ʿahd Banī Isrāʾīl ). 3. Fables …

ʿAzāzīl

(228 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, fallen angel or Ḏj̲inn in the legendary tradition of Islam (does not occur in the Ḳurʾān). He gets his name from the biblical ʿAzāzēl (Leviticus xvi, 8, 10, 26), perhaps demon of the desert (see L. Koehler, Lexicon in Veteris Testamenti Libros , ¶ 693). In point of fact the Muslim tradition extends and develops that of some of the Apocrypha (Enoch and the Apocalypse of Abraham) and of Jewish texts, in which ʿAzāzēl is more or less connected with the fallen angels ʿUzza and ʿAzāʾēl (in Muslim tradition, Hārūt and Mārūt, [ q.v.]); the ḥadīt̲h̲ , however, would appear t…

ʿAmālīḳ

(364 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
(or ʿamāliḳa ), the Amalekites of the Bible. Not mentioned in the Ḳurʾān, this ancient people is connected by Muslim literary tradition to the genealogical table in Genesis x, either to Shem (through Lud-Lāwud̲h̲ or Arpak̲h̲s̲h̲ad), or to Ham. They take the place of the Philistines (the people of Ḏj̲ālūt-Goliath) and of the Midianites (Balaam persuaded them to incite the Israelites to debauchery), and the Pharaohs are alleged to be of their race. On the other hand, in the myt…

Ibn Abi ’l-ʿAwd̲j̲aʾ

(396 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
ʿAbd al-Karīm , a notorious crypto-Manichean ( zindīḳ , [ q.v.]), belonging to a great family (he was the maternal uncle of Maʿn b. Zāʾida [ q.v.]). According to the most reliable information, he lived first at Baṣra, where (although even this is doubtful) he is supposed to have been a disciple of Ḥasan al-Baṣrī [ q.v.], from whom he parted on account of the latter’s doctrinal inconsistency regarding the problem of freewill and determinism. What is more certain is that he frequented a very mixed milieu, rubbing shoulders with Muʿtazilis such as ʿAmr b. ʿUbayd and Wāṣil b. ʿAtāʾ [ qq.v.], with p…

Hābīl wa Ḳābīl

(689 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, names of the two sons of Adam [ q.v.] in Muslim tradition: Heb̲el and Ḳāyin in the Hebrew Bible (for the distortion and assimilation through assonance of the two words, compare the pairs of words Ḏj̲ālūt-Ṭālūt, Hārūt-Mārūt, Yād̲j̲ūd̲j̲-Mād̲j̲ūd̲j̲; Ḳāyin is, however, attested sporadically). Although the Ḳurʾān does not give these names, it tells however (CV, 27-32/30-5, Medinan period) the story of the two sons of Adam, one of whom killed the other because his own sacrifice was refused when his brother…

ʿĀnāniyya

(351 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, Jewish sect of the adepts of ʿĀnān b. David ( c. 760 A.D.), rather incorrectly considered to be the founder of the Karaite schismatic faction; his schism was only one of many which affected Rabbinical Judaism during the 8th-9th centuries. The Muslim authors seem to have taken most of their information about ʿĀnān and his sect from Karaite sources, especially Ḳirḳisānī, but they have only used a small part of the mass of information supplied by him. The author of the al-Badʾ wa ’l-Taʾrīk̲h̲ represents ʿĀnān as a sort of Muʿtazilite, who professes the divi…

al-Dimyāṭī

(244 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
Nūr al-Dīn or Aṣīl al-Dīn ; his dates are uncertain but almost certainly not before the end of the 7th/13th century; author of a ḳaṣīda in lām on the names of God (see al-asmāʾ al-Ḥusnā and d̲h̲ikr ); each verse of this ḳaṣīda is reputed to possess mysterious virtues, given in detail by the commentaries of which the text has several times been the object (the best-known is that by the Moroccan mystic, Aḥmad al-Burnusī Zarrūḳ, d. 899/1493). The ḳaṣīda Dimyāṭiyya holds a considerable place in the worship of the semiliterate, in particular in North Africa…

Idrīs

(1,007 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, person mentioned twice in the Ḳurʾān (second Meccan period): XIX, 57/56-58/57, “And mention in the Book Idrīs; he was a true man ( ṣiddīḳ ), a Prophet. We raised him up to a high place”, and XXI, 85-86, “And [make mention of] Ismāʿīl, Idrīs, D̲h̲u ’l-Kifl—each was of the patient, and We admitted them into Our mercy; they were of the righteous” (tr. A. J. Arberry). Among the explanations suggested for This name, obviously foreign and adapted, like the name Iblīs [ q.v.], to the pattern ifʿīl , may be mentioned that of Casanova (in JA, cciv, 358, followed by Torrey, The Jewish foundation of Islam, N…

Dāniyāl

(649 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
Muslim tradition has retained only a weak and rather confused record of the two biblical characters bearing the name Daniel, the sage of ancient times mentioned by Ezekiel (xiv, 14, 20 and xxviii, 3) and the visionary who lived at the time of the captivity in Babylon, who himself sometimes appears as two different people. Furthermore, the faint trace of a figure from the antiquity of fable combining with the apocalyptic tone of the book handed down in the Bible under the name Daniel, makes Dāniy…

Ibn D̲j̲anāḥ

(203 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, Abu ’l-Walīd Marwān (Hebrew name Yōnāh, Latin name Marinus [?]), Jewish physician and philologist, born at Cordova circa 380/990, died at Saragossa about fifty years later. His very important works, written in Arabic, as a grammarian and lexicographer of the Hebrew language do not concern us here. Ṣāʿid b. Aḥmad Ibn Ṣāʿid al-Andalusī (whose notice was reproduced by Ibn Abī Uṣaybiʿa), however, praises him as a logician and the author of an epitome of pharmacology, which is mentioned also by Ibn al-Bayṭār. (G. Vajda) Bibliography The study by S. Munk (who had correctly deduced th…

Ibn Maymūn

(1,952 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, Abū ʿImrān Mūsā b. ʿUbayd allāh [Maymūn] al-Ḳurṭubī , usually called Moses Maimonides in English and German, Moїse Maїmonide in French, Jewish theologian and physician, born in Cordova in 1135, died in Fusṭāṭ in 1204. A member of a scholarly Jewish family long established in Muslim Spain, Moses Maimonides received his earliest education in his native town which, however, he was compelled to leave with his family in about 1149 on account of the Almohad invasion and the policy of hostility adopted by the new dynasty [see al-muwaḥḥidūn ] towards the religious mi…

Ibn Dirham

(541 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, D̲j̲aʿd , heretic, was a native of K̲h̲urāsān but spent most of his life at Damascus; he was imprisoned and then put to death, on the orders of His̲h̲ām b. ʿAbd al-Malik [ q.v.], by K̲h̲ālid al-Ḳasrī [ q.v.] on the day of the Feast of Sacrifices as a substitute for the ritual sacrifice of a sheep; the sources vary on the place and date of his execution: Kūfa or Wāsiṭ, 124/742 or 125/743. Very few facts are known on the doctrinal position of D̲j̲aʿd b. Dirham; it is, however, clear that anti-Marwānid political propaganda and theolog…

Ibn Gabirol

(910 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, Abū Ayyūb Sulaymān b. Yaḥyā (in Hebrew: S̲h̲elōmōh ben Yehudāh; the Latin Avencebrol; Gabirol, or rather Gebirol, is perhaps Ḏj̲ubayr plus the Romance diminutive suffix - ol), Jewish poet and philosopher, born at Malaga circa 411/1021-2, died at Valencia 450/1058 (but this date is not absolutely certain). In addition to his works, mainly poetry, written in Hebrew, which do not concern us here, Ibn Gabirol wrote in Arabic a short treatise on morals ( Iṣlāḥ al-ak̲h̲lāḳ ), which summarizes without much originality (but adapting them to the needs of t…

Ahl al-Kitāb

(2,207 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, “possessors of the Scripture” (or “people of the Book”). This term, in the Ḳurʾān and the resultant Muslim terminology, denotes the Jews and the Christians, repositories of the earlier revealed books, al-Tawrāt [ q.v.] = the Torah, al-Zabūr [ q.v.] the Psalms, and al-Ind̲j̲īl [ q.v.] = the Gospel. The use of this term was later extended to the Sabeans ( al-Ṣābiʾa [ q.v.])—both the genuine Sabeans, mentioned in the Ḳurʾān alongside the Jews and the Christians (= Mandeans), and the spurious Sabeans (star-worshippers of Ḥarrān)—to the Zoroastrians ( Mad̲j̲iūs [ q.v.]), and, in India, e…

Hāmān

(101 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, name of a person whom the Ḳurʾān associates with Pharaoh ( Firʿawn [ q.v.]), because of ¶ a still unexplained confusion with the minister of Ahasuerus in the Biblical book of Esther. To the details given s.v. firʿawn , should be added the fact that, according to al-Masʿūdī, Murūd̲j̲ , ii, 368, Hāmān built the canal of Sardūs, but Firʿawn obliged him to repay to the peasants the money which he had extorted from them for this. (G. Vajda) Bibliography given in the art. firʿawn see also J. Horovitz, Koranische Untersuchungen, 149 A. Jeffery, The foreign vocabulary of the Qurʾān, 284.

Hārūt wa-Mārūt

(849 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
In one of its admonitions to the unbelieving Jews of Medina, the Ḳurʾān (II, 102/96) expresses itself thus (from A. J. Arberry’s translation): “[the children of Israel] follow what the Satans recited over Solomon’s Kingdom. Solomon disbelieved not, but the Satans disbelieved, teaching the people sorcery, and that which was sent down upon Babylon’s two angels Hārūt and Mārūt; they taught not any man, without they said, “We are but a temptation; do not disbelieve …””. The Ḳurʾānic narrative, linked somewhat artificially with Solomon, whose relations with demons are well-known [see sulay…

Balʿam

(272 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
b. baʿūr (ā), Bilʿam b. Beʿor of the Hebrew Bible. The Ḳurʾān does not mention him, unless perhaps in an allusion in vii, 175 [174] 176 [175]. The commentators and historians keep the main elements of the Biblical story in their accounts of him (Numbers xxii-xxiv, xxxi, 8) and following the Jewish Aggada which likewise has given other features of his portrait, make him responsible for the fornication of the Israelites with the daughters of Moab and Midian (Numbers xxv); note that he tends to absor…

Buk̲h̲t-naṣ(ṣ)ar

(387 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, the Nebuchadnezzar of the Bible. The Ḳurʾān does not mention him. He is a very complex figure in Muslim tradition and here we can record only the outstanding points. It retains in the first place the main Biblical features, using to an unusual degree the texts of the prophets Jeremiah and even Isaiah, and establishing a connexion between Buk̲h̲t-Naṣar and Sennacherib, whom it makes the great-grandfather of the former. It also confuses him sometimes with later rulers such as Cyrus and Ahasuerus…

D̲h̲u ’l-Kifl

(414 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, a personage twice mentioned in the Ḳurʾān (XXI, 85 and XXXVIII, 48, probably second Meccan period), about whom neither Ḳurʾānic contexts nor Muslim exegesis provides any certain information. John Walker ( Who is D̲h̲u ’l-Kifl ?, in MW, xvi (1926), 399-401) would like the name to be understood in the sense of “the man with the double recompense” or rather “the man who received recompense twice over”, that is to say Job (Ayyūb [ q.v.]; cf. Job xlii, 10). Without being certain, this explanation does not lack probability; in any case, no better suggestion has been put fo…

D̲j̲ālūt

(382 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, The Goliath of the Bible appears as D̲j̲ālūt in the Ḳurʾān (II, 248/247-252/251) (the line of al-Samawʾal where the name occurs is inauthentic), in assonance with Ṭālūt [ q.v.] and perhaps also under the influence of the Hebrew word gālūt , “exile, Diaspora”, which must have been frequently on the lips of the Jews in Arabia as elsewhere. The passage of the Ḳurʾān where he is referred to by name (his introduction in the exegesis of V, 25 seems to be sporadic and secondary) combines the biblical account of the war…

Ḥabīb al-Nad̲j̲d̲j̲ār

(329 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
(the carpenter), legendary character who gave his name to the sanctuary below mount Silpius at Antāḳiya [ q.v.] where his tomb is reputed to be. He is not mentioned in the Ḳurʾān; nevertheless Muslim tradition finds him there, in sūra XXXVI, 12 ff., under the description of the man who was put to death in a city ( ḳarya ) not otherwise specified, having urged its inhabitants not to reject the three apostles who had come to proclaim the divine message to them. According to Muslim tradition the “city” was Antioch and the anonymous be…

al-Dimyāṭī, ʿAbd al-Muʾmin b. K̲h̲alaf S̲h̲araf al-Dīn al-Tūnī al-Dimyāṭī al-S̲h̲āfiʿī

(290 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, traditionist born in 613/1217 on the island of Tūnā between Tinnīs and Damietta; at the end of his career he was professor at the Manṣūriyya and at the Ẓāhiriyya in Cairo, where he died in 705/1306. Apart from the works listed by Brockelmann, to be supplemented by the recent study of A. Dietrich, ʿAbdalmuʾmin b. Xalaf ad-Dimyāṭī’nin bir muhācirūn listesi , in Şarkiyat Mecmuasi , iii (1959), 125-55) he has left a dictionary of authorities, often cited and used by subsequent historians and biographers, called Muʿd̲j̲am S̲h̲uyūk̲h̲ ; it only survives at the pre…

Al-Dimyāṭī

(260 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
ʿAbd al-Muʾmin b. Ḵh̲alaf S̲h̲araf al-dīn al-Tūnī al-Dimyāṭī al-S̲h̲āfiʿī, traditionniste né en 613/1217 à l’île deTūna entre Tinnīs et Damiette, professeur en fin de carrière à la Manṣūriyya et à la Ẓāhiriyya au Caire, où il est mort en 705/1306. Outre les ouvrages enregistrés par Brockelmann (qu’il faut compléter par la récente étude d’ A. Dietrich, ʿAbdalmuʾmin b. Xalaf ad-Dimyāṭīʾnin bir muhācirūn listesi, dans Ṣarkyat Mecmuasi, III (1959), 125-55), il laissé un dictionnaire des autorités, Muʿd̲j̲am S̲h̲uyūk̲h̲, souvent cité et utilisé par les historiens et biograph…

ʿĀnāniyya

(351 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, secte juive des adeptes de ʿĀnān b. David (vers 760 de J.-C.), considéré assez inexactement comme le fondateur de la dissidence «karaïte», alors que son schisme n’est qu’un de ceux qui ont affecté le judaïsme rabbinique au cours des VIIIe-IXe siècles. Les auteurs musulmans semblent avoir puisé la plupart de leurs informations au sujet de ʿĀnān et de sa secte dans les sources karaϊtes et surtout chez Ḳirḳisānī, en ne retenant toutefois qu’une petite partie des données abondantes fournies par ce dernier. L’auteur du Kitāb al-badʾ wa-l-taʾrīk̲h̲ fait de ʿĀnān une sorte de muʿtazili…

Buk̲h̲t-naṣ(ṣ)ar

(365 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, le Nabuchodonosor de la Bible. Le Ḳurʾān ne le mentionne pas. Sa figure est très complexe (nous n’en pouvons rappeler ici que quelques traits saillants) dans les traditions musulmanes. Celles-ci retiennent d’une part les principales données bibliques, avec utilisation, rare dans son ampleur, de textes prophétiques, de Jérémie et même d’Isaïe, et établissent une connexion entre Buk̲h̲t- Naṣar et Sennachérib dont elles font le grand-père du premier; elles le confondent parfois aussi avec des sou…

Ḏj̲ālūt

(388 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, le Goliath biblique, qui prend dans le Ḳurʾān (II, 248/247-252/251) le nom de Ḏj̲ālūt (le vers d’al-Samawʾal où il apparaît est inauthentique), en assonance avec Ṭālūt [ q.v.] et peut-être aussi sous l’influence du mot hébreu gālūt «exil, diaspora», qui devait être fréquent dans la bouche des Juifs d’Arabie comme d’ailleurs. Le passage du Ḳurʾān où il figure nommément (son introduction dans l’exégèse de V, 25, semble sporadique et secondaire) combine la narration biblique des guerres menées par Saül et par David (I Samuel XVII) a…

Ibn Ḏj̲anāḥ

(199 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, Abū l-Walīd Marwūn (nom hébreu Yōnāh, nom roman Marinus[?]), médecin et philologue juif, né à Cordoue vers 990, mort à Saragosse une cinquantaine d’années plus tard. Sa très importante œuvre, écrite en arabe, de grammairien et de lexicographe de la langue hébraïque, ne nous concerne pas ici. Sāʿid b. Aḥmad Ibn Sāʿid al-Andalusī — dont la notice a été reprise par Ibn Abl Uṣaybiʿa — le mentionne cependant élogieusement comme logicien et auteur d’un précis de pharmacologie, cité par ailleurs par Ibn al-Bayṭār. (G. Vajda) Bibliography L’étude de S. Munk (qui avait justement conjectu…

Irmiyā

(540 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
(le nom est également écrit Armiyā et Urmiyā, avec ou sans madd), le prophète Jérémie (Yirměyāhū) de la Bible hébraïque, ne figure pas dans le Ḳurʾān, bien que son histoire légendaire soit rattachée par l’exégèse traditionnelle à la sourate II, 261/259, «récit édifiant» (R. Blachère) inspiré de l’écrit apocryphe «Paralipomènes de Jérémie» ou III Baruch (éd. R. Harris, The Rest of the Words of Baruch, Londres 1889; traduction allemande, P. Riessler, Altjüdisches Schrifttum ausserhalb der Bibel, Augsbourg 1928, 903-19; rétroversion hébraïque J. Licht, Séfer maʿasey Yirmeyāhū, dans S…

Hābīl wa-Ḳābīl

(656 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, noms des deux fils d’Adam [ q.v.] dans la tradition musulmane: Hebel et Ḳāyin dans la Bible hébraïque (pour la déformation et assimilation par assonance des deux mots, comparer les couples Ḏj̲ālūt-Ṭālūt, Hārūt-Mārūt, Yād̲j̲ūd̲j̲-Mād̲j̲ūd̲j̲; Ḳāyin est toutefois attesté sporadiquement). ¶ Si le Kurʾān n’a pas ces noms, il relate cependant (CV, 27-32/30-5, période médinoise) l’histoire des deux fils d’Adam dont l’un tua l’autre parce qu’il vit son oblation refusée alors que celle de son frère fut agréée. Le Ḳurʾān relate aussi, trait é…

Balʿam

(267 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
b. Bāʿūr (ā), Bilʿam b. Beʿor de la Bible hébraïque. Le Ḳurʾān ne le mentionne pas, sinon peut-être par allusion, dans VII, 175 [174], 176 [175] Les commentateurs et les historiens retiennent à son sujet les éléments principaux du récit biblique ( Nombres, xxii-xxiv, xxxi, 8) et le rendent responsable, à la suite de l’Aggada juive, qui a également fourni quelques autres éléments de son portrait, de la fornication des Israélites avec les filles de Moab et de Madian ( Nombres, xxv); noter que sa figure tend à absorber celle de Balaḳ, qui apparaît rarement dans les sources musu…

Isrāʾīliyyāt

(867 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, terme arabe couvrant trois sortes de récits, que l’on trouve chez les commentateurs du Ḳurʾān, les mystiques, les compilateurs d’histoires édifiantes et les littérateurs de divers niveaux. 1. Récits tenus pour des relations historiques, qui apportaient des compléments aux données souvent sommaires fournies par le Livre révélé touchant les personnages de la Bible ( Tawrāt et Ind̲j̲īl), en particulier les prophètes ( Ḳiṣaṣ al-anbiyāʾ). 2. Narrations édifiantes situées dans le cadre chronologique — d’ailleurs entièrement imprécis — de «l’époque des (anciens) Israélites» ( ʿahd B…

Ahl al-Kitāb

(2,111 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
«Possesseurs de l’Écriture» (ou «Gens du Livre»). Par ce nom, le Coran et la terminologie musulmane consécutive désignent les Juifs et les Chrétiens, détenteurs des livres révélés anciens: al-Tawrāt [ q.v.] = la Torah, al-Zabūr [ q.v.] = le Psautier, al-Ind̲j̲īl [ q.v.] = l’Évangile. Par extension, et plus tardivement, la même désignation fut appliquée aux Sabéens ( Ṣābʾūn [ q.v.]) authentiques ¶ (nommés dans le Coran à côté des Juifs et des Chrétiens [= Mandéens]) et inauthentiques (astrolâtres de Ḥarrān), aux Zorostriens ( Mad̲j̲ūs, [ q.v.], dans l’Inde même aux idolâtres. Le présent…

ʿAzāzīl

(215 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, ange déchu ou Ḏj̲inn dans la tradition légendaire de l’Islam (n’est pas dans le Ḳurʾān). Il tient son nom du ʿAzāzēl biblique ( Lévitique XVI, 8, 10, 26), peut-être démon du désert (voir L. Koehler, Lexicon in Veteris Testamenti Libros, 693). En fait, la tradition musulmane prolonge et développe celle de certains Apocryphes ( Hénoch et Apocalypse dʾAbraham) et textes juifs dans lesquels ʿAzāzēl est rapproché d’une manière ou d’une autre des anges déchus ʿUzza et ʿAzāʾēl (dans la tradition musulmane, Hārūt et Mārūt, [ q. v.]); le ḥadīt̲h̲ semble cependant innover en considérant ʿAz…

Ḏh̲ū l-Kifl

(399 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, personnage deux fois nommé dans le Ḳurʾān (XXI, 85 et XXXVIII, 48, probablement deuxième période mekkoise), sur lequel ni les con- textes ḳurʾāniques ni l’exégèse musulmane ne four- nissent aucune donnée sûre. John Walker ( Who is Dhu l-Kifl?, dans MW, XVI (1926), 399-401) veut entendre le nom au sens de «l’homme à la double récompense» ou plutôt «celui qui a reçu compen- sation au double», c’est-à-dire Job (Ayyūb [ q.v.]; cf. Job, XLII, 10). Sans être certaine, cette explica- tion ne manque pas de vraisemblance; en tout cas, on n’en a pas proposé de meilleure. L…

Ḥabīb al-Nad̲j̲d̲j̲ār

(316 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
(le charpentier), personnage légendaire qui a donné son nom au sanctuaire situé sous le mont Silpius à Antâkiya [ q.v.] où son tombeau est censé se trouver. Il n’est pas question de lui dans le Kur’ân; cependant la tradition musulmane l’y retrouve, sourate XXXVI, 12 sqq., sous les traits de l’homme qui fut mis à mort dans une cité ( ḳarya), pas davantage spécifiée, dont il invita les habitants à ne point repousser les trois apôtres qui étaient venus leur annoncer le message divin. Selon les traditions musulmanes, la «cité» était Antioche, et le croyant a…

Hārūt wa-Mārūt

(794 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
Dans une de ses admonestations aux Juifs incrédules de Médine, le Ḳurʿān (II, 102/96) s’exprime ainsi (trad. R. Blachère): «[les fils d’Israël] ont suivi ce que communiquaient les Démons, sous le règne de Salomon. Salomon ne fut point infidèle, mais les Démons furent infidèles. Ils enseignaient aux Hommes la sorcellerie et ce qu’on avait fait descendre, à Babylone, sur les deux anges, Hārūt et Mārūt. Ceux-ci n’instruisaient personne avant de lui dire: «Nous sommes seulement une tentation. Ne sois point impie…». La narration ḳurʾānique reflète donc, mise un peu artificiellem…

Ibn Dirham

(505 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, Ḏj̲aʿd, hérétique originaire du Ḵh̲urāsān, mais ayant surtout habité Damas, emprisonné puis mis à mort sur l’ordre de His̲h̲ām b. ʿAbd al-Malik [ q.v.] par Ḵh̲ālid al-Ḳasrī [ q.v.], le jour de la Fête du Sacrifice, et en substitution au mouton rituel; les sources varient quant au lieu et à l’année de l’exécution. Kūfa ou Wāsiṭ, l’an 124/742 ou 125/ 743. Sur la position doctrinale de Ḏj̲aʿd b. Dirham on ne possède que de maigres données; de toute façon, il est clair que la propagande politique antimarwānide, et celle d’ord…

Dāniyāl

(629 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
La tradition musulmane a conservé un souvenir très faible et assez confus des deux personnages bibliques qui portent le nom de Daniel: le sage antique mentionné par Ezéchiel (XIV, 14, 20 et XXVIII, 3) et le visionnaire contemporain de la captivité de Babylone, lui-même dédoublé parfois. La pâle réminiscence touchant une figure de l’antiquité fabuleuse se combine d’autre part avec le caractère apocalyptique du livre transmis dans la Bible sous le nom de Daniel, et fait ainsi du Dāniyāl de la lége…

ʿAmālīḳ

(359 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
(ou ʿAmāliḳa), les Amalécites de la Bible. Non mentionné dans le Ḳurʾān, cet ancien peuple est rattaché par la tradition littéraire des Musulmans à la table généalogique de Genèse, X, soit à Sem (par Lud-Lāwud̲h̲ ou Arpachs̲h̲ad), soit à Cham. On les substitua aux Philistins (peuple de Ḏj̲ālūt-Goliath) et aux Madianites (Balaam leur conseilla d’inciter les Israélites à la débauche), et on prétendit que les Pharaons étaient de leur race. D’autre part, on les introduisit dans l’histoire fabuleuse de l’Arabie antéislamique et…

Ibn Maymūn

(1,883 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, Abū ʿImrān Mūsā b. ʿUbayd Allāh [Maymūn] al-Ḳurṭubī, habituellement nommé Moïse Maïmonide en français, Moses Maimonides en anglais et en allemand, théologien et médecin juif, né à Cordoue en 1135, mort à Fusṭāṭ en 1204. Originaire d’une famille de lettrés juifs établie de longue date en Espagne musulmane, Moïse Maïmonide reçut sa première formation dans sa ville natale qu’il dut cependant quitter avec les siens vers 1149, a cause de l’invasion almohade et de la politique pratiquée par la nouvelle dynastie [voir al-Muwaḥḥidūn] à rencontre des minorités religieuses. Après un s…

Ibn Gabirol

(861 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, Abū Ayyūb Sulaymān b. Yaḥyā (en hébreu S̲h̲elōmōh ben Yehudāh; Avencebrol des Latins; Gabirol, ou mieux Gěbirol, est peutêtre Ḏj̲ubayr + l’affixe diminutif roman -ol), poète et philosophe juif, né à Malaga vers; 1021-2, mort à Valence vers 1058 (mais cette date n’est pas audessus de toute contestation). En plus de son œuvre, surtout poétique, écrite en hébreu, qui ne nous concerne pas ici, Ibn Gabirol écrivit en arabe un court traité de morale ( Iṣlāḥ al-ak̲h̲lāḳ), qui résume sans grande originalité, mais en les adaptant aux besoins du public arabophone juif, les lieux…

Ibn Abī l-ʿAwd̲j̲āʾ

(377 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, ʿAbd al-Karīm, cryptomanichéen ( zindīḳ [ q.v.]) notoire, issu d’une grande famille (il fut l’oncle maternel de Maʿn b. Zāʾida [ q.v.]). Selon les renseignements les plus dignes de foi, il vécut d’abord à Baṣra où il aurait été (cela même est douteux) disciple d’al-Ḥasan al-Baṣrī [ q.v.] dont il se serait séparé en lui reprochant son inconsistance doctrinale quant au problème de la ¶ liberté et du déterminisme. Ce qui est plus sûr, c’est qu’il fréquenta un milieu très mêlé où se coudoyaient des Muʿtazilites comme ʿAmr b. ʿUbayd et Wāṣil b. ʿAṭāʾ [ q.vv.], des poètes mal vus par les Musul…

Idrīs

(983 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, personnage deux fois mentionné dans le Ḳurʾān (2e période mekkoise): XIX, 57[56]-58[57], «Et mentionne, dans l’Écriture, Idrīs qui fut un pur ( ṣiddīḳ) et prophète et que nous élevâmes à un rang auguste» et XXI, 85-86 «Et [fais mention] d’Ismāʿīl, d’Idrīs, de Ḏh̲ū l-Kifl! Chacun d’eux fut parmi les Constants et nous les fîmes entrer dans Notre miséricorde. Ils sont parmi les Saints» (trad. R. Blachère). — Parmi les explications proposées pour ce nom, visiblement étranger et ramené, comme Iblis [ q.v.] au schème if ʿīl, on peut citer celle de Casanova (dans JA, CCIV, 358, suivi par Torrey, Th…

al-Dimyātī

(223 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, Nūr al-Dīn ou Aṣīl al-Dīn, auteur de date incertaine, mais difficilement antérieur à la fin du VIIe/XIIIe siècle, d’une ḳaşīda en lām sur les noms de Dieu [voir al-Asmāʾ al-Ḥusna et Ḏh̲ikr] dont chaque vers est censé posséder des vertus mystérieuses que détaillent les commentaires dont ce texte fut plusieurs fois l’objet (le plus répandu en est celui du mystique marocain Aḥmad al-Burnusī Zarrūḳ, mort en 899/ 1493). La Ḳaṣīda Dimyāṭiyya tient une place considérable dans la piété des demi-lettrés surtout en Afrique du Nord. Une traduction en osmanli en a été faite …

Hāmān

(88 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G.
, nom d’un personnage que le Ḳurʾān associe à Pharaon ( Firʿawn [ q.v.]), par une confusion, encore inexpliquée, avec le ministre d’Assuérus dans le livre biblique d’Esther. Aux détails donnés ci- dessus, s.v. Firʿawn, ajouter que, d’après al-Masʿūdī, Murūd̲j̲, II, 368, Hāmān fit construire le canal de Sardūs, mais Firʿawn l’obligea à rembourser aux paysans l’argent qu’il leur avait extorqué pour cela. (G. Vajda) Bibliography elle a été donnée à l’art. Firʿawn voir encore J. Horovitz, KoranischeUntersuchungen, 149 A. Jeffery, The Foreign Vocabulary of the Qurʾān, 284.

Ibn al-Rāwandī or al-Rēwendī

(1,304 words)

Author(s): Kraus, P. | Vajda, G.
, Abu ’l-Ḥusayn Aḥmad b. Yaḥyā b. Isḥāḳ , Muʿtazilī and heretic, born at the beginning of the 3rd/9th century. The unsolved problem of the date of his death (the middle or the end of the 4th/10th century) should probably be decided, in spite of certain indications to the contrary, in favour of the earlier date, given that his work on the supposed criticism of prophecy by the Brahmans (see al-barāhima but the article omits to mention This point) is already mentioned in an unpublished fragment by the Jewish mutakallim Dāwūd b. Marwān al-Raḳḳ…

Hārūn b. ʿImrān

(565 words)

Author(s): Eisenberg, G. | Vajda, G.
, the Aaron of the Bible. The Arabic form of the name derives from the Syro-Palestinian. The Ḳurʾān, which mentions him from the second Meccan period onwards, places him in its lines of prophets, associating him, as does the book of Exodus, with Moses at the time of the flight from Egypt [see firʿawn ] and accords him a rôle in the making of the Golden Calf, in which, however, the initiative is attributed to the “Sāmirī” [ q.v.]. Ibn Ḥazm, on the other hand, severely criticized the Biblical account, which he regarded as falsified. Hārūn is also the brother of Maryam [ q.v.], but this name is give…

Lūṭ

(748 words)

Author(s): Heller, B. | Vajda, G.
the Biblical Lot [ Genesis , xiii, 5-13, xvii-xix). The Ḳurʾān, where his story is told in passages belonging to the second and third Meccan periods, places Lūṭ among the “envoys” whose career prefigures that of Muḥammad as a man in conflict with his compatriots, those at whom his message is directly aimed; the crimes of the “people of Lūṭ” were, besides the refusal to believe, their persistence in vices such as lack of hospitality and homosexual practices, a misconduct punished, in spite of intercession by Ibrāhīm [ q.v.], by the dispatch of angels of destruction who utterly devas…

Alīsaʿ

(234 words)

Author(s): Seligsohn, M. | Vajda, G.
(or alyasaʿ ) b. uk̲h̲ṭūb (or yak̲h̲tūb ), the biblical prophet Elisha. The Ḳurʾān mentions him twice (vi, 86 and xxxviii, 46, second Meccan period) together with other apostles of Allāh, without special comment. The Arabs have considered the first syllable as the article (discussion of variant ¶ readings in al-Ṭabarī, Tafsīr , vii, 156 ff.). Muslim tradition identifies Alīsaʿ with the son of the widow who sustained Elijah during the famine (I Kings xvii, 9 ff.). This son, a paralytic, was cured by Ilyās (Elijah) and became …

Ḥawwāʾ

(557 words)

Author(s): Eisenberg, J. | Vajda, G.
(Eve), wife of Ādam [ q.v.]. This name does not appear in the Ḳurʾān, which speaks only (VII, 18/19-22/23 and XX, 120 f.) of the “spouse” guilty jointly with her husband of the disobedience which cost them expulsion from Paradise. The only ¶ mention of this name in Arabia in pre-Islamic (?) times was in a verse of ʿAdī b. Zayd, if its authenticity is reliable. The Muslim writers after the revelation of the Ḳurʾān all give the name of Ḥawwā to the spouse of the First Man. The biblical etymology of Ḥawwā (Genesis, III, 20: “mother of all living”) is cited in the name of Ibn ʿAbbās (Ibn Saʿd, Tabaḳāt

Ḥām

(762 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G. | Cohen, M.
(Cham), son of Noah [see nūḥ ]; he is not explicitly mentioned in the Ḳuʾrān, but is perhaps alluded to as the unbelieving son of the Patriarch who refused to follow his father at the time of the Flood (XI, 44[42]-49[47]). Later tradition is acquainted with the Biblical story in Genesis , IX, 18-27 (according to which it is not Ḥām but his son Canaan who was cursed for a sin committed by his father) and with the legendary amplifications elaborated by Jews and Christians; as the story in the Ḳurʾān in conjunction with these …

ʿImrān

(352 words)

Author(s): Eisenberg, J. | Vajda, G.
(Hebrew ʿAmrām, modified to an authentically Arabic name, cf. Horovitz, Koranische Untersuchungen , 128), name given in “Israelite” history as related by Muslim authors to two persons: the first appears in the Bible but not in the Ḳurʾān; the second vice versa. The first is the father of Mūsā, Hārūn and Maryam [ qq.v.], the son of Ḳāhit̲h̲ (Kohath), the son of Lāwī (Levi) according to the Biblical genealogy (Exodus, VI, 20) followed by al-Yaʿḳūbī, ed. Houtsma, 31 (tr. G. Smit, Bijbel en Legende , 39) and al-Masʿūdī, Murūd̲j̲ , i, 92, tr. Pellat, i, § 85; others…

Ḥizḳīl

(351 words)

Author(s): Eisenberg, J. | Vajda, G.
, the biblical prophet Ezekiel. His name does not occur in the Ḳurʾān, but traditional exegesis regards him as that prophet of the people concerning whom the Ḳurʾān speaks in these words (II, 243/244): “Hast thou not regarded those who went forth from their habitations in their thousands fearful of death? God said to them “Die!”, then He gave them life” (tr. A. J. Arberry). According to exegetic tradition, this took place in the time of the prophet Ḥizḳīl b. Būd̲h̲ī (or Būzī, corrupted into Būrī; in the Bible Buzi—Ezekiel, I, 3); the ¶ immediate cause of this mortality was an outbreak of plague ( ṭ…

ʿImrān

(332 words)

Author(s): Eisenberg, J. | Vajda, G.
(hébreu ʿAmrām, ajusté à un nom authentiquement arabe, cf. Horovitz, Koranische Untersuchungen, 128), nom donné, dans l’histoire «Israélite» relatée par les auteurs musulmans, à deux personnages: le premier est biblique, mais ne figure pas dans le Ḳurʾān; pour le second, c’est l’inverse. Le premier est le père de Mūsā, Hārūn et Maryam [ q.vv.], fils de Ḳāhit̲h̲ (Ḳehat), fils de Lāwī (Levi) d’après la généalogie biblique ( Exode, VI, 20) suivie par al-Yaʿḳūbī, éd. Houtsma, 31 (trad. G. Smit, Bijbel en Légende 39) et al-Masʿūdī, Murūd̲j̲, I, 92, trad. Pellat, I, §85; d’autres, par…

Ibn al-Rāwandī ou al-Rēwendī

(1,239 words)

Author(s): Kraus, P. | Vajda, G.
, Abū l-Ḥusayn Aḥmad b. Yaḥyā b. Isḥāḳ, muʿtazilite et hérétique, né au début du IIIe/IXe siècle. Le problème en suspens de la date de sa mort (milieu ou fin du IIIe siècle) doit probablement être tranché, en dépit de certains indices pour le contraire, en faveur de la plus ancienne, étant donné que la prétendue critique de la prophétie par les Brahmanes ( al-Barāhima [ q.v.], mais cet article omet de men-tionner ce point) qu’il a forgée est déjà mentionnée dans un fragment inédit du mutakallim juif Dāwūd Ibn Marwān al-Raḳḳī dit al-Muḳammiṣ, dont l’activité littéraire n’est pas p…

Ḥizḳīl

(330 words)

Author(s): Eisenberg, J. | Vajda, G.
, le prophète Ezéchiel de la Bible. Son nom n’est pas énoncé dans le Kurʾān, mais l’exégèse traditionnelle l’y retrouve comme prophète du peuple à propos duquel le Livre Saint s’exprime en ces termes (II, 243/244): «N’as-tu point vu ceux qui sont sortis de leur habitat, par milliers, par crainte de la mort? Allah leur avait dit «Mourez!», puis II les fit revivre» (trad. R. Blachère). Selon la tradition exégétique, cela se passa à l’époque du prophète Ḥizkīl b. Būdī (ou Būzī, déformé en Būrī, dans la Bible ; la cause immédiate de cette mortalité fut une épidémie de peste ( ṭāʿūn), et la descript…

Hārūn b. ʿImrān

(539 words)

Author(s): Eisenberg, G. | Vajda, G.
, l’Aaron de la Bible. La forme arabe du nom dérive du syro-palestinien. Le Ḳurʾān, qui le mentionne depuis la seconde période mekkoise, le fait figurer dans ses chaînes de prophètes, l’associe, conformément au récit de l’Exode, à Moïse lors de la sortie d’Égypte [voir Firʿawn] et lui fait jouer un rôle dans la confection du Veau d’Or, où cependant l’action décisive est imputée au «Sāmirī» [ q.v.]. Ibn Ḥazm critiqua cependant sévèrement le récit biblique qu’il tenait pour falsifié. Hārūn est aussi frère de Maryam [ q.v.], mais ce nom ne s’applique dans le Ḳurʾān qu’à la mère de Jésus [voir ʿĪsā]…

Alīsaʿ

(230 words)

Author(s): Seligsohn, M. | Vajda, G.
(ou Alyasaʿ) b. Uk̲h̲ṭūb (ou Yak̲h̲ṭūb), le prophète Elisée de la Bible. Le Ḳurʾān le mentionne deux fois (VI, 86 et XXXVIII, 46, deuxième période mekkoise) à côté d’autres apôtres d’Allāh, sans indications particulières. Les Arabes ont pris la première syllabe du nom pour l’article (discussion des différentes leçons chez Ṭabarī, Tafsīr, VII, 158 sq.). La légende musulmane identifie Alīsaʿ avec le fils de la veuve qui hébergea Elie pendant la disette (1 Rois XVII, 9 sq.). Ce fils, paralytique, fut guéri par Ilyās (Elie) et devint alors son disci…

Ḥawwāʾ

(532 words)

Author(s): Eisenberg, J. | Vajda, G.
(Ève), épouse d’Adam [ q.v.]. Ce nom ne figure pas dans le Ḳurʾān, qui parle seulement (VII, 18[19]-22[23] et XX, 120 sq.) de l’«épouse», solidairement coupable, avec son mari, de la désobéissance qui leur valut l’expulsion du Paradis. La seule mention antéislamique (?) du nom en Arabie serait un vers de ʿAdī b. Zayd si son authenticité était certaine. Les auteurs musulmans postérieurs au Ḳurʾān donnent tous le nom de Ḥawwāʾ à la conjointe du Premier Homme. L’étymologie biblique de Ḥawwāʾ (Genèse, III, 20: «mère de tous les vivants») est rapportée au nom d’Ibn ʿAbbās (Ibn Saʿd, Ṭabaḳāt, I/1…

Lūṭ

(700 words)

Author(s): Heller, B. | Vajda, G.
, le Loth de la Bible (Genèse, XIII, 5-13, XVIII-XIX). Le Ḳurʾān, où son histoire est évoquée dans des passages appartenant à la seconde et à la troisième périodes mekkoises, place Lūṭ parmi les «envoyés» dont la carrière préfigure celle de Muḥammad en conflit avec ses compatriotes, destinataires directs de son message; les crimes du «peuple de Lūṭ» furent, outre le refus de croire, leur persistance dans des vices comme le manque d’hospitalité et les pratiques homosexuelles, inconduite châtiée, malgré l’intercession d’Ibrāhīm [ q.v.], par l’envoi d’anges destructeurs qui boule…

Ḥām

(731 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G. | Cohen, M.
(Cham), fils de Noé [voir Nūh]; il n’est pas explicitement mentionné dans le Ḳurʾān, mais c’est peut-être lui qui est visé par le fils incroyant du Patriarche qui refusa, lors du Déluge, de suivre son père (XI, 44-9/42-7). La tradition postérieure connaît le récit biblique de Genèse IX, 18-27 — selon lequel ce n’est pas Cham, mais son fils Chanaan qui fut maudit pour faute commise par son père —et les amplifications légendaires élaborées par les Juifs et les Chrétiens; le récit du Ḳurʾān combiné avec ces données exigeant un quatrième fils d…

Firʿawn

(1,237 words)

Author(s): Wensinck, A.J. | Vajda, G.
(pl. Farāʿina ), Pharaoh. The Arabic form of the name may derive from the Syriac or the Ethiopie. Commentators on the Ḳurʾān (II, 46-49) explain the word as the permanent title ( laḳab ) of the Amalekite kings [see ʿamālīk ], on the analogy of Kisrā, title of the sovereigns of Persia, and Ḳayṣar of the emperors of Byzantium. As the designation of the typical haughty and insolent tyrant, the name Firʿawn gave rise to a verb tafarʿana “to behave like a hardened tyrant”.—If one disregards certain verses of Umayya which are probabl…

Ilyās

(537 words)

Author(s): Wensinck, A.J. | Vajda, G.
is the name given in the Ḳurʾān (VI, 85 and XXXVII, 123, with a variant Ilyāsīn, perhaps prompted by the rhyme, in verse 130), to the Biblical prophet Elijah; the form Ilyās derives from ’Ελιας, a Hellenized adjustment, but attested also in Syrian and Ethiopic, of the Hebrew name Eliyāh (ū): cf. Jos. Horovitz, Koranische Untersuchungen , 81, 99, 101. In the Ḳurʾān, the figure of Ilyās scarcely shows any outstanding features, except for one allusion (in XXXVII, 125) to the worship of Baal. In the Muslim legend related by later au…

Judaeo-Arabic

(9,734 words)

Author(s): Cohen, D. | Blau, J. | Vajda, G.
, the usual name for the spoken—or in some cases the written—language of the Jews in the Arabic-speaking countries. i. judaeo-arabic dialects. The traditional term “Judaeo-Arabic” has certainly less justification when used in connection with the spoken usage than with the written usage defined above. It suggests the erroneous idea of a form of speech common to all Arabic-speaking Jews, and offering characteristics linked in some way to religious or ethnic facts. Now though it cannot be denied that the religious facto…

Binyāmīn

(167 words)

Author(s): Wensinck, A.J. | Vajda, G.
, the Benjamin of the Bible. In its nairation of the history of Joseph (Yūsuf, [ q.v.]), the Ḳurʾān gives a place to the latter’s uterine brother (xii, 8, 59-79), without ever mentioning him by name. Tradition embellishes without any great variation the biblical story concerning him (it is aware notably that his birth cost his mother her life) and receives also Aggadic additions (summarised notably in the Encyclopaedia Judaica , iv, 112-14), such as the etymological connexion of the names of his sons with the lost elder brother. In Muslim mys…

Id̲j̲āza

(1,444 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G. | I. Goldziher-[S. A. Bonebakker]
(A.) autorisation, licence. En tant que terme technique, ce mot désigne, au sens étroit, la troisième des huit manières de recevoir transmission du ḥadīt̲h̲ [ q.v.];les diverses modalités en sont exposées avec précision dans W. Marçais, Taqrîb, 115-26;c’est en somme le fait qu’un garant qualifié d’un texte ou d’un livre entier, son œuvre propre ou un ouvrage reçu par l’intermédiaire d’une chaîne de transmetteurs remontant au premier transmetteur ou à l’auteur, accorde à quelqu’un l’autorisation de le transmettre à son tour de sort…

Ilyās

(489 words)

Author(s): Wensinck, A.J. | Vajda, G.
est le nom donné dans le Ḳurʾān (VI, 85 et XXXVII, 123, avec une variante Ilyāsīn, peut-être appelée par la rime, au verset 130) au prophète biblique Élie; la forme Ilyās procède de ’EλιαΣ, ajustement hellénisé, mais également attesté en syriaque et en éthiopien, du nom hébreu Eliyāh (ū): cf. Jos. Horovitz, Koranische Untersuchungen, 81, 99, 101. — Dans le Ḳurʾān, la figure d’Ilyās n’offre guère de traits saillants, sauf une allusion (en XXXVII, 125) au culte de Baal. Dans la légende musulmane relatée par les auteurs postérieurs, on note d’une par…

Judéo-arabe

(9,546 words)

Author(s): Cohen, D. | Blau, J. | Vajda, G.
, appellation générale de la langue arabe parlée ou parfois écrite par les Juifs dans les pays arabophones. I. — Parlers judÉo-arabes. Le terme traditionnel de «judéo-arabe» a certainement moins de justification lorsqu’il s’agit de l’usage parlé que de l’usage écrit défini ci-dessous. Il suggère la notion fausse d’un parler commun aux Juifs arabophones et présentant des caractéristiques liées en quelque façon à des faits religieux ou ethniques. Or s’il y a eu une influence incontestable du fait religieux sur l’arabe …

Firʿawn

(1,201 words)

Author(s): Wensinck, A.J. | Vajda, G.
(plur. Farāʿina), Pharaon. La forme arabe du nom peut venir du syriaque ou de l’éthiopien. Les commentateurs du Ḳurʾān (II, 46/49) expliquent le mot comme surnom constant ( laḳab) des rois amalécites [voir ʿAmālīk], à l’instar de Kisrā pour les souverains perses et de Ḳayçar pour les empereurs de Byzance. Désignation du prototype des tyrans orgueilleux et insolents, le nom Firʿawn donna naissance à un verbe tafarʿana «se comporter en tyran endurci ». — Si on laisse de côté quelques vers sans doute inauthentiques d’Umayya, c’est bien le Ḳurʾān qui a introduit, …

Binyāmīn

(165 words)

Author(s): Wensinck, A.J. | Vajda, G.
, le Benjamin de la Bible. Dans sa narration de l’histoire de Joseph (Yūsuf [ q.v.]), le Ḳurʾān fait place au frère utérin de celui-ci (XII, 8, 59-79) sans toutefois le désigner nommément. La tradition brode, sans grands écarts, sur les données bibliques le concernant (elle sait notamment que sa naissance avait coûté la vie à sa mère) et accueille également des amplifications aggadiques (résumées notamment dans Encyclopedia Judaica, IV, 112-114), comme la mise en relation étymologique des noms de ses fils avec le frère aîné perdu. Dans la mystique musulmane, le …

Id̲j̲āza

(1,533 words)

Author(s): Vajda, G. | Goldziher, I. | Bonebakker, S.A.
(a.) authorization, licence. When used in its technical meaning, this word means, in the strict sense, the third of the eight methods of receiving the transmission of a ḥadīt̲h̲ [ q.v.] (the various ways are set out precisely in W. Marçais, Taqrîb , 115-26). It means in short the fact that an authorized guarantor of a text or of a whole book (his own work or a work received through a chain of transmitters going back to the first transmitter or to the author) gives a person the authorization to transmit it in his tu…
▲   Back to top   ▲