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13–17.2.4.5 Esther

(306 words)

Author(s): Michael G. Wechsler
Part of 13–17 Five Scrolls - 13–17.2 Secondary Translations - 13–17.2.4 Late Syriac Translations With the exception of forty single-word citations (in a couple of instances two words) in Andreas Masius’ Syrorum Peculium,1 the Syro-Hexaplaric text of Esther is, unfortunately, non-extant. The lost manuscript of Masius from which the citations were drawn, and which apparently contained the entire book of Esther, was proven by Rahlfs2 to be closely related in character and age to the late-eighth-/early-ninth-century c.e. Milan manuscript (i.e., c. 313 Inf. of the Ambrosian Libr…
Date: 2017-03-01

13–17.2.4.1 Ruth

(1,321 words)

Author(s): Michael G. Wechsler
Part of 13–17 Five Scrolls - 13–17.2 Secondary Translations - 13–17.2.4 Late Syriac Translations 13–17.2.4.1.1 Text The complete Syro-Hexaplaric text of the book of Ruth is extant in a unique eighth-century c.e. manuscript,1 i.e., Add. 17.103 of the British Library (London), containing both Judges (folios 4r–61v) and Ruth (folios 62v–70r), the text of which was edited by Rørdam in 1861,2 and then again by de Lagarde in 1892.3 Undoubtedly, there are also citations from Syh-Ruth remaining to be found in pre-modern Syriac literature (21.9), though we have found …
Date: 2017-03-01

13–17.1.4.5 Esther

(3,133 words)

Author(s): Michael G. Wechsler
Part of 13–17 Five Scrolls - 13–17.1 Primary Translations - 13–17.1.4 Peshitta 13–17.1.4.5.1 Background Translated by the end of the second century c.e., the original text of the Peshiṭta version of Esther (s-Esth) – as far as such can be retrieved – represents a clear and close (though not slavish) rendering of the Hebrew text as represented by mt (17.2.2). In only a handful of instances, after allowing for the possibility of scribal corruption in the Syriac transmission process, does the extant text of s-Esth reasonably imply a consonantal reading and/or vocalization of the…
Date: 2017-03-01

13–17.1.4.1 Ruth

(2,839 words)

Author(s): Michael G. Wechsler
Part of 13–17 Five Scrolls - 13–17.1 Primary Translations - 13–17.1.4 Peshitta 13–17.1.4.1.1 Background Translated by the end of the second century c.e., the original text of the Peshiṭta version of Ruth (s-Ruth) – as far as such can be retrieved – represents a generally faithful rendering of the Hebrew text as represented by mt (13.2.2); relatively minor adjustments away from a strictly “literal” rendering are evident throughout, attesting a consistent overarching desire to produce a version of the book that is both conceptually and idiomaticall…
Date: 2017-03-01

3–5.2.3.2 Judges

(1,522 words)

Author(s): Michael G. Wechsler
Part of 3–5 Former Prophets - 3–5.2 Secondary Translations - 3–5.2.3 Ethiopic Translations 3–5.2.3.2.1 Background The Ethiopic (Gǝ‛ǝz) text of Judges – at least in the text form edited by Dillmann (3–5.2.3.2.2) – is based primarily on lxx (4.3), with a certain (at this point immeasurable, albeit relatively small) contributing influence by mt (4.2.2) and the Peshitta (3–5.1.4) during the original phase of translation, in the fourth to seventh centuries. Scholarly consensus further maintains that sometime during the fourteenth and fifteenth centu…
Date: 2016-11-01