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Székesfehérvár

(480 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
(Ottoman, Istōlnī/Ustōlnī Belg̲h̲rād [from Serbian stolni belgrad “white capital castie”]; German, Stuhlweiβenburg; Latin Alba Regia), a town and centre of a sand̲j̲aḳ in Transdanubia, Hungary, and one of the main royal and ecclesiastical centres from the time of St. Stephen (1000-38), where several kings were crowned and buried. Realising its strategic and spiritual importance in the Buda-Esztergom-Székesfehérvár triangle, the Ottomans took the town and its castle, which fell without considerable resistance, on 3 September, during the 1543 c…

Temes̲h̲wār

(593 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
, Ṭi̊mi̊s̲h̲wār (?), the Ottoman rendering of Magyar Temesvár, Romanian Timişoara, a town and centre of a wilāyet in Ottoman Hungary, belonging to Romania since 1919. First mentioned in an 1177 charter, Temesvár acquired regional importance as the seat of a county; even the royal court functioned here between 1315 and 1323. Situated near the Ottoman-Hungarian border, it gained strategic significance. In ca. 1480 a captainship-in-general was created around Temesvár in order to organise the defence of the eastern frontiers; the fortress resisted an Ottoman attack in 1551. Although th…

Zenta

(395 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
(Serbian Senta), a town on the right bank of the Tisza in the ancient Hungarian county of Bács-Bodrog, today in northern Serbia. A decisive battle was fought in its vicinity on 24 Ṣafar 1109/11 September 1697 between the forces of Sultan Muṣṭafā II [ q.v.] and Prince Eugene of Savoy. Ottoman rule in Hungary collapsed relatively rapidly ¶ after Buda was recaptured in 1686. Resistance to the allied Christian armies was sparse and took place along the Drava-Danube line only. Following a serious defeat at Szalánkemén (Stari Slankamen) in 1102/1691, where the Grand Vizier Köprülü Muṣṭafā [ q.v.]…

Pécs

(750 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
(Ottoman Pečūy , German Fünfkirchen, Latin Quinque Ecclesiae), town and centre of a sand̲j̲aḳ in Transdanubian Hungary. Founded on the site of Roman Sopianae and preserving remnants of buildings from the first centuries of Christianity, Pécs became an episcopal see in 1009, housed the first university of the country (established in 1367) and was the most important economic centre south of Lake Balaton throughout the Middle Ages. The town surrendered without fight to the forces of Ḳāsi̊m, sand̲j̲aḳ-begi of Mohács [ q.v.], and Murād, sand̲jaḳ-begi of Pozsega…

Mohács

(1,272 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
(Ottoman Mihāč), a town in the county of Baranya, in southern Hungary. In its vicinity two important battles (a, b) took place, while the settlement itself gave name to an Ottoman sand̲j̲aḳ (c) in the 16th-17th centuries. (a) The first battle of Mohács, the more decisive of the two, was fought on 21 D̲h̲u ’l-Ḳaʿda 932/August 1526. With Süleymān I’s accession to the throne in 926/1520, a new era started in the western politics of the Ottoman Empire. While Selīm I had had mainly eastern targets, his son turned towards ¶ Europe. Hungary, which had formerly been a s…

Pest

(445 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
(Ottoman Pes̲h̲te ), formerly a separate town, in Ottoman times centre of a nāḥiye in the sand̲j̲aḳ of Budīn [ q.v.], today part of the capital of Hungary. It was an earlier settlement than Buda, with mostly German inhabitants. After the Mongol invasion in A.D. 1241-2, with the creation of the fortification on the Castle Hill of present-day Buda (called new Pest for a period), Pest slowly lost some of its importance and was overshadowed by the capital, to which also the Germans moved. Nevertheless, the population of Pest reached some 7-8,000 souls at the end of the 15th century. Although surro…

Mezökeresztes

(478 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
, the Battle of Mezökeresztes (Turkish: Hāčova or Ṭābūr muḥārebesi ), the most important encounter between the Habsburg-Hungarian and Ottoman troops during the “long” or 15-years’ war. This took place near a village, south-east of Eger [ q.v.] in Hungary on 5 Rābīʿ I 1005/26 October 1596. Its immediate antecedent was the capture of Eger by the forces of Meḥemmed III, the first sultan who personally took the field in war after Süleymān I’s death. The Imperial troops, which had originally been sent to relieve this important city unde…

Köszeg

(310 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
, German Güns, a small Hungarian town near the Austrian border with a mediaeval castle which was sieged and symbolically taken by the Ottomans in 1532. In the first decades of his reign, mainly under the influence of the Grand Vizier Ibrāhīm Pas̲h̲a, Süleymān the Magnificent cherished world-conquering ambitions. To achieve this goal, he intended, among other things, to defeat the Austrian Habsburgs by occupying their capital. After the unsuccessful 1529 campaign, he undertook another military operation in 1532 with the aim of marching against Vienna. The Ottoman army proceeded sl…

Nagyvárad

(751 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
(Ottoman Turkish: Warād , Wārād , Warāt , etc., Romanian: Oradea, German: Groβwardein), an important town originally in the Hungarian county of Bihar, part of Transylvania after the creation of this principality, centre of an Ottoman wilāyet [ q.v.] between 1660 and 1692, and today a place of regional significance in Romania with a considerable Hungarian population. As a fortified place since the 10th century and as seat of a bishop since the 11th century, Várad acquired early importance among Hungarian towns. Partly destroyed by the Mongols in 1241, …

Sigetwār

(416 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
, the Ottoman orthography for Szigetvár , a town and centre of a sand̲j̲aḳ , temporarily of a beglerbegilik , in Transdanubian Hungary. The originally not very important town and castle, situated in the morasses of the rivulet Almás, became a significant military centre of Habsburg Hungary after the fall of Székesfehérvár and Pécs, the main royal and episcopal towns in Transdanubia. An unsuccessful Ottoman attack was directed against it in 963/1556. Ten years later, Süleymān the Magnificent [ q.v.] led his last campaign against Szigetvár, which put up a strong resistance. …

Szeged

(409 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
(Ottoman, Segedīn), a town and centre of a sand̲j̲aḳ in the Great Plain of Hungary, along the river Tisza. First mentioned in a 1183 charter, Szeged acquired town privileges in the 13th century and became a civitas (“free royal town”) in 1498. After being ransacked by the Ottomans in 1526 and by the Serbian militia of “Tsar” Yovan in 1527, it enjoyed peaceful years until 1541. Since the town had some ruinous remnants of a mediaeval castle only, it was unable to show resistance, and was easily taken by the Ottoman Pas̲h̲a of Buda early in 1543. A sand̲j̲aḳ was created immediately around Szege…

Zsitvatorok

(311 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
, the name of a peace-treaty signed by the Ottomans and the Habsburgs in 1606, and so-called ever since the negotiations leading to it started on boats at the confluence of the rivers Zsitva and Danube (the literal meaning of the word being “Zsitva mouth”). The peace treaty put an end to the so-called “Long” or “Fifteen Years’ War”, which was begun in 1593 and renewed each year, bringing smaller or bigger successes to both sides without a final victory. The revolt led by István Bocskai against the Habsburgs helped the Ottomans to a certain…

Sigetwār

(405 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
, orthographe ottomane du mot Szigetvár, ville et centre d’un sand̲j̲aḳ, temporairement d’un beger-begilik dans la Hongrie transdanubienne. La ville d’origine et le château, relativement peu importants à l’origine, situés dans les marais du petit cours d’eau Almás, devinrent un centre militaire hongrois des Habsbourg d’importance, après la chute de Székesfehérvâr et Pécs, villes transdanubiennes royales et épiscopales. Une vaine attaque ottomane fut menée contre elle en 963/1556. Dix ans plus tard, Süleymān le Magnifique [ q.v.] conduisit sa dernière campagne contre Szi…

Szeged

(447 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
(turc ottoman Segedīn), ville et cheflieu de sand̲j̲aḳ dans la grande plaine de Hongrie, sur la rivière Tisza. Mentionnée pour la première fois dans un document de 1183, Szeged acquit les privilèges municipaux au XIIIe siècle et devint une civitas («ville libre royale») en 1498. Après avoir été ravagée par les Ottomans en 1526 et par la milice serbe du «Tsar» Yovan en 1527, elle jouit d’une période de paix jusqu’en 1541. La ville ne possédant alors que des vestiges en ruine de son château médiéval, elle fut hors d’état de résister et…

Mohács

(1,344 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
(ottoman Mihāč), ville du district de Baranya, dans la Hongrie méridionale. Deux importantes batailles (1, 2) ont eu lieu dans les environs, et la ville elle-même a donné son nom à un sand̲j̲aḳ ottoman (3) aux XVIe-XVIIe siècles. — 1. La première bataille de Mohács, la plus décisive des deux, eut lieu le 21 d̲h̲ū l-ḳaʿda 932/29 août 1526. Avec l’accession au trône du Süleymān Ier en 926/1520, une nouvelle période s’ouvrit dans la politique occidentale de l’empire ottoman. Alors que Selīm Ier visait principalement des objectifs orientaux, son fils se tourna vers l’Europe. La H…

Köszeg

(338 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
, en allemand Güns, petite ville hongroise près de la frontière autrichienne avec un château médiéval qui fut assiégé et pris symboliquement par les Ottomans en 1532. Dans les premières décennies de son règne, Süleymān le Magnifique, sous l’influence du grand Vizir Ibrāhīm Pas̲h̲a, caressait des projets de conquête mondiale. Pour parvenir à ses fins, il tenta entre autres choses d’infliger une défaite aux Habsbourg d’Autriche, en occupant leur capitale. Après la campagne infructueuse de 1529, il engagea son armée dans une…

Székesfehérvár

(499 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
, en turc ottoman Istōlnī/ Ustōlnī Belg̲h̲rād (du serbe stolni belgrad «capitale ¶ blanche fortifiée»); en allemand Stuhlweissenburg, en latin Alba Regia, ville et chef-lieu de sand̲j̲aḳ en Transdanubie (Hongrie), l’un des principaux centres royaux et ecclésiastiques de l’époque de Saint Etienne (1000-38), où plusieurs rois furent couronnés et inhumés. Ayant compris son importance stratégique et spirituelle dans le triangle Buda — Esztergom — Székesfehérvár, les Ottomans prirent la ville et sa forteresse, qui tombèrent sans grande résistance au…

Pest

(465 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
(ottoman Pesjite), primitivement ville autonome, à l’époque ottomane chef-lieu de nāḥiye dans le sand̲j̲aḳ de Budīn [ q.v.], de nos jours partie de la capitale de la Hongrie. ¶ Pest est un établissement antérieur à Buda, avec une majorité d’habitants allemands. Après l’invasion mongole de 1241-2 et la construction des fortifications de la Butte du Château de l’actuelle Buda (appelée Nouvelle Pest pendant un temps), Pest perdit lentement de son importance et fut éclipsée par la capitale, vers laquelle les Allemands migraient…

Mezökeresztes

(484 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
la bataille de Mezökeresztes (en turc: Hāčova ou Ṭābūr muḥārebesi), est la plus importante rencontre de la «Longue Guerre» ou «Guerre de Quinze Ans», entre les Austro Hongrois et les troupes ottomanes. Elle s’est déroulée près d’un village situé au Sud-est d’Eger, en Hongrie, le 5 rabīʿ I 1005/26 octobre 1596. Immédiatement auparavant, avait eu lieu la prise d’Eger par les forces de Meḥemmed III, le premier sultan qui prit personnellement les armes après la mort de Süleymān ier. Les troupes impériales, qui avaient primitivement été envoyées pour secourir cette importante …

Zenta

(421 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
(Senta en serbe), une ville sur la rive droite de la Tisza, dans l’ancien comté hongrois de Bács-Bodrog, aujourd’hui au Nord de la Serbie. Le 25 ṣafar 1109/11 septembre 1697, une bataille décisive opposa à proximité les forces du sultan Muṣṭafā II [ q.v.] à celles du prince Eugène de Savoie. Le souveraineté ottomane sur la Hongrie s’était écroulée assez vite après la reconquête de Buda en 1686. Les armées chrétiennes alliées n’avait rencontré qu’une résistance dispersée, sauf sur la ligne Drave-Danube. À la suite d’une défaite sérieuse à Szalánk…

Nagyvárad

(761 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
(turc ottoman: Warād, Wārād, Warāṭ, etc.; roumain: Oradea; allemand: Grosswardein), importante ville qui faisait partie, à l’origine, du comté hongrois de Bihar, passa à la Transylvanie après la création de cette principauté, devint le cheflieu d’un wilāyet ottoman entre 1660 et 1692; c’est aujourd’hui une localité d’importance régionale en Roumanie, avec une population hongroise considérable. Place forte depuis le Xe siècle et évêché depuis le XIe, Várad a pris de bonne heure de l’importance parmi les villes hongroises. Détruite en partie par les Mongols en …

Pécs

(780 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
(ottoman Pečūy, allemand Fünfldrchen, latin Quinque Ecclesiae), ville et chef-lieu d’un sand̲j̲aḳ en Hongrie transdanubienne. Fondée sur l’emplacement de la Sopianae romaine et conservant des vestiges des premiers siècles chrétiens, Pécs devint siège épiscopal en 1009, abrita la première université du pays (établie en 1367) et fut le plus important centre économique au Sud du lac Balaton tout au long du moyen âge. La ville se rendit sans coup férir aux forces de Ḳāsi̊m, sand̲j̲aḳ-begi de Mohács [ q. v. ], et de Murād, sand̲j̲aḳ-begi de Pozsega (Pōzheg̲h̲a), au cours de la sixiè…

Zsitvatorok

(340 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
, nom du traité de paix signé entre les Ottomans et les Habsbourg en 1606 et ainsi dénommé même si les négociations débutèrent sur des navires ancrés au confluent du Danube et de la rivière Zsitva (le nom de la localité signifiant «bouche de la Zsitva»). Ce traité de paix mettait fin à la «Longue Guerre», dite aussi «Guerre de Quinze Ans», qui avait débuté en 1593 et qui avait repris chaque année, apportant petits ou grands succès à chacun des deux camps sans donner lieu à une victoire définitive. La révolte conduite par István Bocskai cont…

Temes̲h̲wār

(607 words)

Author(s): Dávid, G.
, Ṭi̇mi̇s̲h̲wār (?), forme ottomane du mot Temesvár en hongrois, Timişoara en roumain, ville et centre d’une wilāyet de la Hongrie ottomane, rattachée à la Roumanie depuis 1919. Mentionnée tout d’abord dans une charte de 1177, Temesvár acquit une importance régionale en tant que siège d’un comté; la cour royale y fonctionna entre 1315 et 1323. Située près de la frontière ottomane, son importance stratégique devint évidente. Vers 1480, une charge de lieutenant-général fut créée à Temesvár afin d’organiser la défense des fro…

MĀLIK, NISṬŌRĪS GĪWARGĪS

(669 words)

Author(s): David G. Malick
(1864-1927), Assyrian priest, educator, and writer was born in the village of Sipūrḡān in the Urmia plain, Azerbaijan; he succeeded in persuading Norwegian Lutherans to sponsor missionary work aimed at supporting, rather than converting, the Church of the East. MĀLIK, Qaššīšāʾ NISṬŌRĪS GĪWARGĪS (Nestorius George Malech), Assyrian priest, educator, and writer (1864-1927; Figure 1). Qaššīšāʾ (priest) Nisṭōrīs was born in the village of Sipūrḡān (Per. Sopurḡān) in the Urmia plain, Azerbaijan. He was the younger son of Šamāšāʾ (deacon) Gīwa…
Date: 2016-10-14

MĀLIK, DĀWĪD GĪWARGĪS

(1,047 words)

Author(s): David G. Malick
(1861-1931), Assyrian poet and historian, born in the village of Sipūrḡān in the Urmia plain; served as secretary of the Patriarchal Church Committee. MĀLIK, Mīrzāʾ DĀWĪD GĪWARGĪS, Assyrian poet and historian (1861-1931; Figure 1). Mīrzā Dāwīd was born in the village of Sipūrḡān (Per. Sopurḡān) in the Urmia plain, Azerbaijan. He was the older son of Šamāšāʾ (deacon) Gīwargīs Dāwīd Mālik. After completing studies in the village primary school and Urmia College, Mīrzā Dāwīd traveled to Russia to study history at the Univer…
Date: 2016-10-14

MĀLIK, GĪWARGĪS DĀWĪD

(885 words)

Author(s): David G. Malick
(1836-1909), Assyrian writer, educator, and missionary, born in the village of Sipūrḡān in the Urmia plain, Azerbaijan; his work with Americans and Europeans enabled him to travel widely in the Middle East and Europe. MĀLIK, Šamāšāʾ GĪWARGĪS DĀWĪD, Assyrian writer, educator, and missionary (1836-1909; Figure 1). Šamāšāʾ (deacon) Gīwargīs was born in the village of Sipūrḡān in the Urmia plain, Azerbaijan. He belonged to the Bēt Mālik family, one of the four major clans of the village. Surviving tombstones indicate that the family wa…
Date: 2016-09-21

SOPURḠĀN

(1,005 words)

Author(s): David G. Malick
Neo-Aramaic Sipūrḡān, Assyrian village in the Urmia plain, situated on the Nazlu river, 26 km northeast of the city of Urmia. SOPURḠĀN, Neo-Aramaic Sipūrḡān, Assyrian village in the Urmia plain, situated on the Nazlu river, 26 km northeast of the city of Urmia (Razmārā, p. 262; Dehḵodā, s.v.) and 2 km from the edge of Lake Urmia (Mālik, p. 1; see map, Figure 1). Mīrzāʾ Dāwīd Gīwargīs Mālik claims that the name is not from Iranian (cf. Pers. sopur, designation of a functionary responsible for road cleaning; Moʿin, II, p. 1826; Dehḵodā, s.v.) but, rather, Assyrian in origin…
Date: 2016-09-25

Church of God, Cleveland

(992 words)

Author(s): Roebuck, David G.
The Church of God (COG) is an international denomination based in Cleveland, Tennessee. In September 2019, the denomination reported more than 7.6 million members and 39,696 churches in 185 nations and territories.On August 19, 1886, Richard Green Spurling, with assistance from his father, Richard Spurling, established a congregation called Christian Union in Monroe County, Tennessee. Emphasizing the New Testament as their “only rule of faith and practice” along with loving God and neighbor, Spurling and the eight who joined …
Date: 2021-03-09

Theophilos, Periegesis Sikelias (573)

(1,304 words)

Author(s): Smith, David G.
This entry was prepared by David G. Smith and published on 1 October 2012. About this Historian Historian: Theophilos, Periegesis Sikelias Jacoby number: 573 Attested works: Historian's date: uncertain Historical focus: III. History of Cities and Peoples ( Horography and Ethnography) | B. Authors on Single Cities and Regions | LXIX. Sicilia and Magna Graecia Place of origin: unknown   BNJ 573 F 1 Source: Stephanos of Byzantion, Ethnika, s.v. Παλική (496 Meineke) Work mentioned: Source date: 6th century AD Source language: Greek Fragment subject: geography, ancient - …

Alkimos (560)

(12,102 words)

Author(s): Smith, David G.
This entry was prepared by David G. Smith and published on 1 October 2013. About this Historian Historian: Alkimos Jacoby number: 560 Attested works: Historian's date: 4th century BC 3rd century BC Historical focus: III. History of Cities and Peoples ( Horography and Ethnography) | B. Authors on Single Cities and Regions | LXIX. Sicilia and Magna Graecia Place of origin: unknown   BNJ 560 T 1 Source: Diogenes Laertios, Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers 2.114 (M. Marcovich (ed.), Diogenis Laertii Vitae Philosophorum 1 (Stuttgart 1999)) Work mentioned: Source date: 3rd century …

Lykos (Boutheras) of Rhegium (570)

(14,783 words)

Author(s): Smith, David G.
This entry was prepared by David G. Smith and published on 1 April 2013. About this Historian Historian: Lykos (Boutheras) of Rhegium Jacoby number: 570 Attested works: Historian's date: 4th century BC 3rd century BC Historical focus: III. History of Cities and Peoples ( Horography and Ethnography) | B. Authors on Single Cities and Regions | LXIX. Sicilia and Magna Graecia Place of origin: unknown   BNJ 570 T 1 Source: Suda, s.v. Λύκος (A. Adler (ed.), Suidae Lexicon 3 (Stuttgart 1933), 1967) Work mentioned: Source date: 10th century AD Source language: Greek Fragment subject: history, an…

Hippys (554)

(11,538 words)

Author(s): Smith, David G.
This entry was prepared by David G. Smith and published on 1 April 2013. About this Historian Historian: Hippys Jacoby number: 554 Attested works: Historian's date: 5th century BC 4th century BC Historical focus: III. History of Cities and Peoples ( Horography and Ethnography) | B. Authors on Single Cities and Regions | LXVIII. Siphnos Place of origin: unknown   BNJ 554 T 1 Source: Suda, s.v. ῞Ιπ(π)υς ῾Ρηγῖνος (ed. Adler) Work mentioned: Source date: 10th century AD Source language: Greek Fragment subject: history, ancient - Library of Congress epitome Textual base: Jacoby Suda, Lexikon,…

Eisenhower and the Berlin Problem, 1953-1954

(101 words)

Author(s): Coleman, David G.
Bibliographic entry in Chapter 14: The U…

Vietnam, 1945: The Quest for Power

(100 words)

Author(s): Marr, David G.
Bibliographic entry in Chapter 17: The U…

Vietnamese Tradition on Trial, 1920-1945

(56 words)

Author(s): Marr, David G.
Bibliographic entry in Chapter 17: The U…

Vietnam: State, War, and Revolution (1945-1946)

(133 words)

Author(s): Marr, David G.
Bibliographic entry in Chapter 17: The U…

Tyrrell, George

(299 words)

Author(s): Schultenover, David G.
[German Version] (Feb 6, 1861, Dublin – Jul 15, 1909, Storrington, England). Educated primarily at Rathmines School, Dublin, Tyrrell moved to London (1879), converted to Roman Catholicism (May 18, 1879), and entered the Jesuit order. His childhood pattern of being the “odd man out” continued throughout his Jesuit years. He dissented from the constrained, semimonastic formation of the “restored” Society of Jesus and particularly post-Vatican I, ultramontane (Ultramontanism), ¶ neoscholastic (Neoscholasticism) intellectualism. Jesuit professors Thomas and Joseph Ri…

The Missiles of November, December, January, February

(134 words)

Author(s): Coleman, David G.
Bibliographic entry in Chapter 19: The U…

Chrysostom, John

(1,193 words)

Author(s): Hunter, David G.
John of Antioch (ca. 347–407), surnamed Chrysostom, “Golden-mouthed,” was bishop of Constantinople and the greatest preacher of the patristic era. Born and raised at Antioch in Syria, the son of Christian parents of the educated upper class, John received the finest rhetorical education available, under the disting…

Tyrrell

(266 words)

Author(s): Schultenover, David G.
[English Version] Tyrrell, George (6.2.1861 Dublin – 15.7.1909 Storrington, England). Nach Schulzeit in Dublin kam T. nach London (1879), konvertierte zum röm. Katholizismus (18.5.1879) und trat dem Jesuitenorden bei. Von Jugend an Außenseiter, lehnte er die strenge, halb-monastische Form der »wiederhergestellten« Societas Jesu und v.a. ihren nach dem Vaticanum I gestärkten Ultramontanismus und ihren neuscholastischen (Neuscholastik) Intellektualismus ab. Durch die Jesuitenprofessoren Thomas und Jo…

The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris

(73 words)

Author(s): McCullough, David G.
Bibliographic entry in Chapter 8: Expans…

The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris

(71 words)

Author(s): McCullough, David G.
Bibliographic entry in Chapter 27: Race,…

Sinān Pas̲h̲a, K̲h̲od̲j̲a

(1,834 words)

Author(s): Woodhead, Christine | Babinger, Fr. | Dávid, G.
, the name of two Ottoman dignitaries. 1. The vizier, scholar and prose writer (845-91/1440-86). Sinān al-Dīn Yūsuf Pas̲h̲a was born probably in 845/1440, in Bursa, the son of K̲h̲i̊ḍr Beg b. Ḳāḍī D̲j̲elāl al-Dīn (d. 863/1459 [ q.v.]), the first Ottoman ḳāḍī of Istanbul. Through his mother, a daughter of Mollā Yegān (d. 878/1473), he was also descended from a second ʿulemāʾ family prominent in the early Ottoman period. After initial appointments as müderris in Edirne, he was promoted by Meḥemmed II to a teaching post at the Istanbul

Sinān Pas̲h̲a, K̲h̲od̲j̲a

(1,885 words)

Author(s): Woodhead, Christine | Babinger, Fr. | Dávid, G.
, nom de deux dignitaires ottomans. 1. Le vizir, savant et prosateur, (845-91/ 1440-86). Sinān al-dīn Yūsuf Pas̲h̲a naquit probablement en 845/1440 à Bursa de Ḵh̲iḍr Beg b. Ḳāḍī Ḏj̲elāl al-dīn (m. 863/1459 [ q.v.]), premier ḳāḍī ottoman d’Istanbul. Par sa mère, fille de Mollā Yegān (m. 878/1473), il descendait aussi d’une autre famille de ʿulemāʾ qui se distingua au cours de la période ottomane des débuts. Après avoir servi comme müderris à Edirne, il fut désigné par Meḥemmed II à un poste d’enseignement dans le ṣaḥn-i t̲h̲emāniye [ q.v.] d’Istanbul, …
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